3 Ways Tech Companies Can Improve the Talent Acquisition Process

It’s reasonable to correlate the quality of the talent acquisition process to the quality of employees in the company– which is tied to the success of the company. Yet, there is currently a shortage of qualified experts in field of cyber security and there has been for quite some time. And while tech companies have pulled back the reins on hiring tech talent due to the economic consequences of the coronavirus outbreak, reports CBNC, more emphasis is being placed on preserving team member jobs and revitalizing the hiring process as we all prepare to re-open and heal. Out of the chaos of recent events comes opportunity and tech companies are showing more resilience than ever as tech leaders identify pragmatic ways to staff up. We’ve got three foundational tips to help hiring managers and senior cyber security / IT leaders fill their cyber talent and candidate pools with qualified professionals who not only look good on paper, but can demonstrate their qualifications.

But before we dig into those recommendations, let’s establish some context first.

State of the cyber security talent in the tech sector

The role of the cyber security professional continues to develop and gain more authority and responsibility as the security landscape and the integration of business and technology evolves.

When we look at the current climate of cyber security jobs in the U.S., we see bleak yet in-demand overtones. Finding qualified cyber talent and candidates is very much like searching for a needle in a haystack for hiring managers and recruiters.

  • It takes an average of 3-6 months to fill a cyber security job position (Dark Reading)
  • In 2019, there were over 700,000 unfilled IT jobs in the U.S. (CNBC)
  • Employment of computer and information technology occupations is projected to grow 12 percent from 2018 to 2028 (Bureau of Labor Statistics)

While all companies likely struggle to find qualified cyber talent, the technology sector has its own unique set of challenges that are important to discuss and be aware of. Emerging technology, disruptive tech, the sheer evolution and the fast-paced nature of the industry make it hard to find candidates who have experience and knowledge in specialized areas of technology­–many of which are just now becoming adopted into businesses.

IT, security managers, operators and human resource leaders realize that:

  1. they need to focus on filling positions with quality candidates who can demonstrate their skills in a skills-deprived landscape
  2. to achieve that objective, more can be done in the recruitment and hiring phase.

Okay, let’s talk about those recommendations now. And if you have more suggestions based on what’s worked with your company, let us know!

Promote from within

The first logical step in filling a cyber position is to promote from within the company. It saves on time and cost to recruit. There may be IT generalists in your company who desire to take their career to a new level in cyber security and you’re just not aware of it (…and may have the aptitude and willingness to learn).

If an IT generalist is interested in filling a needed cyber security position (e.g. information security engineer, network architect, systems analyst), consider giving them a project to test their skills and ambition and see how they do. More on this in a second.

To promote from within, ensure you’ve communicated the requirements of the position clearly to the company across all departments. People in cyber security positions come from all walks of life: computer science, history, military, political science, yes, even fields like philosophy. Yet they all have one thing in common: They share a deep and abiding interest in how technology works, notes Cyber Degrees.

So find those individuals who are looking to grow into a new position within the company and interview them. You may be surprised to learn there are passionate people willing to learn and grow, right in your own company ‘backyard.’

Test skills during the interview process

Allow candidates the opportunity to demonstrate what’s on their resumé. Online cyber training platforms like Project Ares can help HR managers and decision makers ‘see’ how a prospect might tackle a realistic cyber security issue.

·     Evaluate candidate skills in real-time against resumé credentials

·     Assess cyber competencies against other candidates and co-workers

·     Identify strengths in cyber technique, tactics, and procedures

By completing a set of tasks or activities that put skills like digital forensics, Linux skills, ports and protocols, and regular expressions work, candidates can show employers what they know and how they work before they even move on to a second or third interview. It’s one thing to talk about your experience, it’s another to actually apply it in a realistic setting.

Use Project Ares to support internal hiring processes

Circadence’s Project Ares platform helps HR decision makers assess candidate skills and competencies in various aspect of cyber security. And the platform can work for both internal recruitment and external recruitment. If promoting from within and you identify interested candidates who may or may not have a rich cyber background, you can use the platform’s cyber learning games and foundational scenarios to learn aspects of cyber security and security operations in ‘safe’ cyber range environments. If candidates demonstrate a willingness to learn in the platform, that is a good sign. If they are able to follow the guidance and instructions and apply critical thinking to complete the scenarios in the platform, even better. Hiring mangers can literally ‘see’ how an internal candidate responds to the act of learning and one can glean a lot about a candidate’s fit for the position simply through this effort of cyber aptitude testing.

Use Project Ares to support external hiring processes

The same applies for external hiring of cyber security professionals. Hiring managers and cyber security leaders can use Project Ares foundational and specialized scenarios to teach certain cyber skills they are looking for. If you’re looking to fill a position that aligns to a NIST/NICE work role, several exercises in the platform can address those specific skill sets. Further, the Assessment Reports can help HR professionals evaluate candidate strengths and compare those results against other candidates who have engaged in the platform to identify the best company cultural fit and skills fit.

·     Nurture qualified candidates in the platform

·     Retain top talent with professional skills development efforts in the platform

A Wall Street Journal article, sums up the ‘what’s next?’ to these challenges, succinctly:

Tom Gimbel, CEO of LaSalle Network Inc., a technology staffing and recruiting firm, said that once the crisis fades he expects a rebound in tech hiring as businesses seek out technology tools to cut costs and eke out efficiencies during a prolonged economic recovery.

“While new product implementations will slow down, we will see strong hiring of corporate IT, infrastructure, development and security roles,” Mr. Gimbel said.

How person-centered cyber training supports threat prevention in financial companies

Cyber security threats and preventive measures go hand-in-hand. Yet cybercrime continues to impose threats on the financial industry. Financial services firms are 300 times as likely as other companies to be targeted by a cyberattack,” according to a report by the Boston Consulting Group. These threats can arise at any time and occur through various sources (external sources such as hackers, and internal sources such as staff members and contracted employees). Some financial companies have developed action plans with steps to take if a cyber-attack strikes, but cyber security best practices also includes establishing and initiating threat prevention methods. One example of a threat prevention method is person-centered cyber training.

Statistics show that cyber threat prevention is an immense pain point for many financial companies. In a survey of 400 security professionals in financial services, it was observed that financial institutions are better at detecting and containing cyber-attacks and less efficient at preventing them. Almost 56% of financial institutions are useful in detection, and only 31% are good at prevention.

Financial services institutions must understand how to prevent cyber threats, which may require a ground-up approach.

Financial institutions can take immediate measures to engage in threat prevention methods with person-centered training. This type of training allows an IT or cyber professional to practice and hone skills by learning specific cyber lessons pertinent to the financial sector and applicable to their job role. The more upskilled the professional, the more they will be able to protect the company and company assets. A current platform that offers specific job role training is Project Ares.

Person-Centered Training with Project Ares

Circadence’s Project Ares is a browser-based learning platform designed for teaching cyber security in an engaging and hands-on applied method. This platform offers gamification and AI to train employees on the latest cyber threats and attacks. Project Ares is made up of foundational and specialized scenarios in the form of battle rooms and missions that address current cyber threats in the financial sector. The lessons within Project Ares are developed with specific job roles in mind.

For example, various scenarios are developed with the theme of a financial service, so the trainee can learn the skills needed to prepare for a cyber threat. In these specific financial missions, the trainee will learn how to disable botnets, identify and remove suspicious malware, and protect the financial institution.

  • Mission 1 – Operation Goatherd “Disable Botnet” – Acting as a cyber mission force member, the trainee will access the command and control server of a group of hackers to disable a botnet network that is designed to execute a widespread financial scan triggering the collapse of a national bank.
  • Mission 4 – Operation Arctic Cobra “Stop Malicious Processes” – The cyber trainee will analyze network traffic and stop a malicious exfiltration process.
  • Mission 5 – Operation Wounded Bear “Protect Financial Institution” – The trainee identifies and removes malware responsible for identity theft and protects the financial network from further infections.

This individual or team-based mission training delivers collaborative skill-building experiences aligned to NIST/NICE work roles, ensuring the trainee meets specific cyber competencies. This kind of immersive, hands-on training gives learners the ability to practice various forms of threat prevention, which will benefit the company’s overall security posture in the long run.

The more trained cyber professionals are for their job roles, the more likely they will be able to safeguard against threats—and take proactive measures to better prevent cyber threats. If cyber professionals are prepared and well-informed with the right knowledge and skills in their toolbox, threat prevention will be more attainable and achievable for professionals on the frontlines of defense. Professionals will be able to spot a cyber threat, but also prevent cyber threats from breaking the bank.

 

Living our Mission: Circadence Collaborates with Academia and Army to Support Cyber Range Virtual Environment Replication and Construction with N/CRAF

Circadence announced in May 2020 the latest development of an automated network mapping tool for IT use, based on collaborative work with Mississippi State University engineers and researchers. Circadence has had a six-year partnership with the university and the Threat Systems Management Office of Redstone Arsenal (TSMO) and has worked on several projects over the years to solve challenges related to National Defense. We sat down with two of our Circadence personnel: Dwayne Cole, the JMN NOSC (Network Operation and Security Center) Operations Manager and Craig Greenwood, Project Manager with Opposition Force/Advanced Red Team Intrusion Capabilities to understand more about the tool and learn about the benefits it provides to the technology community at large.

The Netmapper/Cyber Range Automation Framework (N/CRAF) project started as two separate projects, Netmapper and CRAF. The projects were recently combined to form a new tool integrating two previously independent efforts:

  • Netmapper — Commissioned by TSMO, developed by Circadence in collaboration with Mississippi State University (MSU) Center for Cyber Innovation (CCI). Netmapper is a graphical tool for the scanning and configuration collection of network infrastructure and integration with NOSC automation.

 

  • Cyber Range Automation Framework (CRAF) — Developed by NOSC engineers to meet mission requirements for rapid and repeatable deployment and configuration of virtual environments. CRAF uses Ansible and other open source tools to instantiate virtual environments.

ncraf logo

N/CRAF Netmapper/Cyber Range Automation Framework is the enabling mechanism for effecting physical resource provisioning and virtual environment instantiation in a rapid and repeatable fashion. It supports the full lifecycle of cyber range virtual environment events.

The Netmapper project was born out of the need to improve the accuracy of Cyber Range emulated network environments. Craig noted that before N/CRAF, range environments were built from a subject matter expert’s assumption/belief of what their network looked like but inevitably those assumptions were never 100% correct. The network mapping process previously required a network administrator or engineer to draw a picture/map of the network which became the basis of virtualize environment used in the exercise(s). One can understand how there was room for error in this manual process – at the least, a small level of concern as to whether a network drawing and virtualization of it was indeed as realistic and accurate as possible.

As a result, Craig says, professionals training in the cyber range environments weren’t actually training on networks that were as ‘close to the real thing’ as possible. There was room to improve.

When automation engineers have real-world scanned networks as a reference, they can more accurately emulate the customers environment. Simply put, as Craig notes, “we took the assumption out of network mapping” with N/CRAF. Now the training moves ever closer to real world environment.

“Imagine scanning a network to extract the DNA which can be used to clone and re-build it” Circadence’s Dwayne Cole describes.

Combining the two programs (Netmapper and CRAF) enabled an iterative approach to cyber range environment build out that also drastically improved the end product. The scanning technology helps the automation engineers verify what they have built; it adds a check for the automation framework. It also can be used by the customer to validate the environment. The customer can easily compare the original design or scan versus the final emulated environment hosted on the Cyber Range.

With N/CRAF, it becomes easier for engineers to share their network models with one another and build out high fidelity networks to facilitate technologies assessments. N/CRAF saves everything to a single XML file to include all the configuration data.  The tool also supports merging and diff’ing the output files. The merge capability allows the engineer to take parts and pieces from other networks or events to add to the current event. This allows the engineers to build special purpose network sections, like synthetic internet or traffic generation, that can be reused/added to current event. N/CRAF is a force multiplier, it enables repeatable, tedious deployment and configuration tasks and improves the reuse of detailed environments for multiple users to train within.

The tool is currently undergoing an accreditation process and is being demoed within defense departments with the goal to deploy it as a standardized tool across various agencies. The potential for the tool to be used in more commercial applications is promising as well.

To read the project announcement issued by Mississippi State University, read the news release: https://www.msstate.edu/newsroom/article/2020/04/msu-circadence-partner-create-virtual-cyber-defense-tool.

 

 

 

Transform Fall Cyber Security Classes with Hands-On Learning

As educators blend classroom and online learning for safe fall course experiences, Project Ares helps get the balance right for teaching cyber security. Whether instructing cyber security courses remotely or in-person, Information Security and Cyber Security educators must make learning engaging and relevant to best prepare students for careers in the field.  Circadence can help educators transform existing cyber security curriculum to support teaching challenges with the Project Ares online learning tool.