Living Our Mission: Building a Roadmap to Bring Product Vision to Reality with Circadence’s Raj Kutty

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This installment of the “Living our Mission” blog series features Circadence’s Rajani “Raj” Kutty, Senior Product Manager.  

Raj is fascinated by technology’s evolution in the marketplace and that interest has informed her career path toward success. She achieved her masters degree in computer science from University of Pennsylvania in 2003. From there, she spent 15-16 years in the tech industry and has always been interested in the everchanging advancements in technology. Her tech background consists of Java programming, business analysis and product management. In the beginning of her career, she worked on mobile app designs, web app development, and programming for various industries including finance, insurance, retail, and more. For the last 10 years, she’s moved into the direction of product management. Her shift into this area began because she enjoys building a roadmap for product development and seeing it through the various stages from identifying a problem in the market, and creating a product that solves pain points for customers. Her experience working with many different industries provides an advantage to Circadence since she has a first-hand understanding of why these businesses can benefit from additional cyber security training to protect company assets.

Raj started at Circadence about 7 months ago and was immediately captivated by the concept of cyber readiness and the security industry as a whole. Throughout her profession, she noticed a growing issue many companies faced: a lack of cyber security awareness and training. Over the years, she heard a lot about the cyber workforce shortage and knew the first step to creating a solution for this problem was to get the user engaged with the right type of training. In her mind, if the user is engaged in training, then it would result in better cyber defense for the organization. Her previous work experience, thoughts about cyber security readiness and ideas around engaged training were validated when she heard what Circadence was doing to help companies be “cyber ready” using gamified learning platforms. In the past, training would consist of a video, classroom lecture or reading textbooks- something dry and boring, she said. Raj felt Circadence offered a unique solution to get people interested in cyber security, which could lead to more strategic cyber defense performance and possibly minimize the cyber workforce gap.

“Training has to be fun and interesting to the user, while still being effective. I feel like Circadence is offering this to the cyber workforce in a game-play mode, which is more engaging for the user.”

Day to day, Raj works with different departments and team members at Circadence developing product strategy and bringing a product roadmap to life. Her knowledge across many industries helps ensure our products meet the needs of different organizations, while still maintaining in-depth cyber training and ease-of-use for the customer. Much like planning a road trip, which requires knowledge of route to destination, Raj leads her team every day by investigating and communicating strategy and plans to determine where they need to go next to bring the product to market.

Her main focus over the last couple months has been a new portal Circadence is developing called CyberBridge. CyberBridge is the entry point at which users can access all Circadence cyber learning platforms including Project Ares®, inCyt®, Orion® and more. It’s a global SaaS platform that offers different types of cyber training content for different markets.

“I love that I get to help design a product that addresses the cyber challenges across different industries and the ability to provide a readiness solution pertinent to each sector’s security pain points.”

The products Raj helps map to market fulfills her goal of bringing much-needed cyber awareness and training solutions to everyone and every business. Her perspective: With every tech integration, Bluetooth connection, and device-to-device communication we implement to make our working lives easier, we inherently increase our cyber risk as our attack surface widens. There are no signs of a slowing tech usage, hence why the importance of cyber awareness continues to grow each day. When we talk about how businesses need to protect themselves, we’re really talking about the people of a business, since people are what make up a company. In today’s world of escalating cyber threats, it’s everyone’s responsibly to gain cyber awareness to protect a company.

“Cybersecurity is like community immunity, when everyone gets vaccinated, we are improving and protecting our greater community, and cyber security works the same way.”

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Microsoft Security Blog: Rethinking cyber scenarios—learning (and training) as you defend

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In this third and final post in the series, Microsoft’s Mark McIntyre addresses more advanced SecOps scenarios that an experienced cyber practitioner would be concerned with understanding.

New Year, New Threats: Top Cyber Threats Anticipated to Hit Big in 2020 for Enterprise Companies

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As we enter the New Year, one thing is certain: cyber attacks aren’t going anywhere. Enterprise companies have been tasked with defending their networks from unyielding cyber crooks who want a piece of the pie for themselves. What’s on the horizon for enterprise security threats in 2020? We’ve got a few predictions.

  • DeepFakes

    Deep Fake technology can create fake but incredibly realistic images, text, and videos. Computers can rapidly process numerous facial biometrics, and mathematically build or classify human features, to mimic a person or group of individuals for public manipulation. Bloomberg reports the tech is becoming so sophisticated, detecting a DeepFake video from a real one, is getting harder and harder to differentiate for viewers.

    While the technical benefits are impressive, underlying flaws inherent in all types of Deep Fake models represent a rapidly growing security weakness, which cyber criminals will exploit. It will be critical for businesses to understand the security risks presented by facial recognition and other biometric systems and educate themselves on the risks as well as hardening systems that require/use facial recognition.

  • API and Cloud vulnerabilities 

    An application programming interface (API) is an interface or communication protocol between different parts of a computer program intended to simplify the implementation and maintenance of software. APIs are an essential tool in cloud environments, acting as a service gateway to enable direct and indirect cloud software and infrastructure services to cloud users.

    A recent study showed more than three in four organizations treat API security differently than web app security, indicating API security readiness lags behind other aspects of application security. The study also reported that more than two-thirds of organizations expose APIs to the public to enable partners and external developers to tap into their software platforms and app ecosystems. Threat actors are following the growing number of organizations using API-enabled apps because APIs continue to be an easy – and vulnerable – means to access a treasure trove of sensitive data. Despite the fallout of large-scale breaches and ongoing threats, APIs often still reside outside of the application security infrastructure and are ignored by security processes and teams.

  • 5G Threats

    With the rollout of 5G continuing in 2020, we will see an increase in the volume and speed of data theft. The AT&T Cybersecurity Insights Report: Security at the Speed of 5G, shows that larger enterprises are not prepared for the security implications of 5G. The top cyber security concerns that came back in this report were:

  • Larger attack surface due to the massive increase in connectivity
  • Greater number of devices accessing the network
  • The extension of security policies
  • Authentication of a larger number and wider variety of devices.

As more 5G devices enter the network, organizations must prepare for the onslaught of added security threats.

  • Ransomware attacks evolve

    Ah, ransomware, seemingly every hacker’s favorite extortion tool. According to McAfee Labs 2020 Threat Prediction Report, the increase of targeted ransomware has created a growing demand for compromised company networks. This demand is met by criminals who specialize in penetrating company networks and sell complete network access in one go.

“I expect that the ransomware used will continue to become more advanced. I am concerned that some threats have just become more stealthy, or are working toward that, and that readily available ransomware will enable even novice criminals to maintain stealth. Organizations are spending more resources to defend against ransomware, which might drive out a few of the lesser players, but any organization with resources will still see ransomware attacks happen as a fast and easy way for financial gain, so hackers will continue to pursue advancements.” ~ Karl Gosset, VP of Content Development at Circadence

It’s clear that the threat landscape will continue to grow and become more sophisticated in the coming year, which means it’s time for businesses to step up their security game.

Circadence believes that the best way to do this is through cyber learning games themselves! Our flagship product, Project Ares, delivers real-world attack scenarios in a safe, online range environment and allows users to practice and hone their cyber skills through the use of games. With missions specific to enterprise threats, such as Operation Crimson Wolf and Operation Desert Whale, Project Ares will ready your organization for any looming threats like these. By using a gamified cyber learning platform like this for your security teams in 2020, you can readily pop some champagne and dance the night away, knowing your enterprise is better protected in the new year.

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Human Resources Takes on Cyber Readiness: How to Mitigate Cyber Risks with Security Awareness Training

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Every year hackers come out of the woodwork to target various companies, specifically around the holiday season. In fact, cyber attacks are estimated to increase by as much as 50 – 60% over the holidays. With staff often spread thin and consumers taking advantage of online shopping and banking for added convenience, the timing is perfect for HR professionals to stay vigilant with how they onboard new employees with cyber education while encouraging good cyber hygiene among existing colleagues. Understanding the risks employees come across while online, how to train them to detect and mitigate these risks, and how you as an HR manager can ensure continued efforts to harden security posture will make you a cyber safety hero this holiday season!

While IT and cyber professionals are primarily responsible for securing a company’s networks and ensuring teams are up to snuff, the reality is that cyber risk extends beyond what occurs in the server room. Human error continues to be one of the top reasons cyber attacks are successful. This means that not only do security teams need to be trained, but cyber training across every department, with every employee who works on a computer, is essential to obtain and maintain good cyber hygiene across the company. If every employee in your organization understands how their actions can impact overall company security, more personal responsibility will be taken to maintain cyber safety.

Don’t fret! HR professionals need not be masters in cyber security. There are great tools out there to help anyone learn the basics and be able to share their foundational learning with others. So, what are some of the things you can learn and train employees on to mitigate attacks?

  • Phishing emails – With inboxes flooded daily, it can be hard to spot potential threats in emails. Hackers send targeted emails that may address a work-related matter from a co-worker or manager. One click on the wrong email, and you could be infecting your business device with malware. It is important every employee understand what suspicious emails “look” like and how to avoid nefarious click bait.
  • Using company devices for personal work – It’s an easy thing to do – grab a work device off the counter and start online shopping, emailing friends and family, or finally getting around to baking that chocolate chip cookie recipe from Martha Stewart. However, accessing un-secured sites and opening personal, and potentially phishing, emails on a work computer puts companies at risk. As an HR manager, you must recognize this common occurrence and be able to speak to it with your staff. If a hacker is able to gain access to a business computer through an employee’s personal use, they gain access to all of the company information on that employee’s device as well.
  • Using personal devices to conduct business – The same can be said for using personal devices to conduct business. It can be difficult to “turn off” after work hours and many employees answer some work emails on their cell phone, or load a work document on his/her personal tablet or laptop. When company staff access potentially sensitive business documents on their personal device, they risk leaking that information to a hacker. To prevent attacks company-wide, HR pros must be aware of how often this type of behavior occurs and work closely with their IT department to learn how company networks are secured when remote access is granted to employees outside of home and work IP addresses.

HR managers: Spread good cyber hygiene!

Security awareness training is becoming increasingly prevalent at companies that know what it takes to have good cyber hygiene. According to a recent report by Infosec, about 53% of U.S companies have some form of security awareness training in place. While this is still barely over half, it’s a start. So what can you do to rank among companies leading the charge in cyber security?

  • Offer continuous training – Cyber security awareness training is not a “one and done” event. This kind of training should continue throughout the year, at all levels of an organization, and be specific to different job roles within the company. Technology is always changing, which means the threatscape is too. When you are battling a constantly shifting enemy, your employees need to be vigilantly trained to understand each shift.
  • Perform “live fire” training exercisesLive fire exercises (LFX) happen when users undergo a simulated cyber attack specific to their job or industry. One example is having your IT department send out a phishing email. See how many people click on it and show them how easily they could have been hacked. This data can be used to show progress, tailor problem areas, and train to specific threats as needed.
  • Stress the importance of security at work and at home – Showing employees the benefit of cyber awareness in the workplace translates to awareness at home as well. Help prospective and existing employees gain a wide breadth of understanding about cyber best practices by making learning approachable instead of unattainable or intimidating.
  • Reward good cyber hygiene – Reward employees who find malicious emails or other threats with your company’s IT team and share success stories of how employees helped thwart security issues with vigilant “eyes” on suspicious activity. Equally, it is important to also empathize with employees who make mistakes and give them the tools to learn from their mistakes. Many employees receive hundreds of emails each day, and while training tips and education are helpful tools, it is not a perfect solution.

Training employees to be cyber aware can be difficult unless a structured program and management strategy is in place. We’re here to help! Circadence’s security awareness platform, inCyt, is coming soon! inCyt allows employees to compete in cyber-themed battles and empowers them to understand professional and personal cyber responsibility. By cultivating safe cyber practices in virtual environments, HR managers can increase security awareness and reduce risks to the business.

To learn more and stay in the know for upcoming product launches, visit www.circadence.com

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Living our Mission: Project Ares Takes Full Flight with Cloud-Native Architecture

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According to CIO magazine, about 96% of organizations use cloud services in one way or another. In partnership with Microsoft, we are proud to announce that Circadence has redesigned its Project Ares cyber learning platform to fully leverage a cloud-native design on Microsoft Azure.  This new, flexible architecture improves cyber training to be even more customized, scalable, accessible, and relevant for today’s professionals.

This transition to cloud infrastructure will yield immediate impacts to our current customers.

  • Increased speeds to launch cyber learning battle rooms and missions
  • Greater ability to onboard more trainees to the system from virtually any location
  • More access to cyber training content that suits their security needs and professional development interests

Proven success at Microsoft Ignite

At the recent Microsoft Ignite conference (November 2019), more than 500 security professionals had the opportunity to use the enhanced platform.  Conference participants set up CyberBridge accounts and then played customized battle rooms in Project Ares. Microsoft cloud-based Azure security solutions were integrated into the cloud-based cyber range to provide an immersive “cloud-in-cloud” sandboxed learning experience that realistically aligned to phases of a ransomware attack.  The new version of Project Ares sustained weeklong intensive usage while delivering on performance. 

So what’s new in the new and improved Project Ares?

Curriculum Access Controls for Tailored Cyber Learning

One of the biggest enhancements for Project Ares clients is that they can now control permissions for  training exercises and solution access at the user level. Customer Administrators will use the new CyberBridge management portal to tailor access to Circadence training exercises for individual users or groups of users.

Single-sign-on through CyberBridge enables the alignment of training exercises to individuals based on their unique learning requirements including:

  • Cyber skill-building exercises and complex missions within Project Ares for cyber professionals
  • Cyber foundation learning with Cyber Essentials tools for the IT team
  • Security awareness training with inCyt for general staff

Cyber Essential learning tools and the inCyt game for security awareness will be added to CyberBridge over the next several months. With the capability to pre-select training activities reflective of a company’s overall security strategy, enterprise security managers can call the shots.

“As the administrator, you now choose what curriculum content your team should have. “This provides more flexibility in cyber training for our customers in terms of what they can expose to their teams.” ~ Rajani Kutty, Senior Product Manager for CyberBridge at Circadence.

Greater Scalability and Performance in Cyber Training

With a cloud-native architecture design, Project Ares can support more simultaneous users on the platform than ever before. Project Ares can now handle over 1,000 concurrent users, a significant improvement over historical capacity of 200-250 concurrent users on the platform.  The combination of  content access control at the group or individual level and the increased scalability of Project Ares creates a solution that effectively spins up cyber ranges with built-in learning exercises for teams and enterprises of any size.  Additionally, this means that no matter where a cyber learner is geographically, they can log on to Project Ares and access training quickly. We see this as similar to the scalability and accessibility of any large global content provider (e.g. Netflix)—in that users who have accounts can log in virtually anywhere in the world at multiple times and access their accounts.

Now that Project Ares can support a greater volume of users on the platform, activities like hosting cyber competitions and events for experts and aspiring security professionals can be done on-demand and at scale.

“We can train more people in cyber than ever before and that is so impactful when we remember the industry’s challenges in workforce gaps and skills deficiencies.” ~ Paul Ellis, Project Ares Senior Product Manager at Circadence

The previous design of Project Ares required placing users in “enclaves” or groups when they signed on to the system to ensure the content within could be loaded quickly without delay. Now, everyone can sign in at any time and have access to learning without loading delays. It doesn’t even matter if multiple people are accessing the same mission or battle room at the same time. Their individual experience loading and playing the exercise won’t be compromised because of increased user activity.

Other performance improvements made to this version of Project Ares include:

  • Quicker download speeds of cyber exercises
  • Use of less memory on user’s computers, and resulting longer battery life for users, thanks to lower CPU utilization.
  • These behind-the-scenes improvements mean that training can happen quicker and learning, faster.

New Cyber Training Content

One new Mission and three new Battle Rooms will be deployed throughout the next few months on this new version of Project Ares.

  • Mission 15, Operation Raging Mammoth, showcases how to protect against an Election attack
  • Battle Rooms 19 and 20 feature Splunk Enterprise installation, configuration, and fundamentals
  • Battle Room 21 teaches Powershell cmdlet (pronounced command-lets) basics

Mission 15 has been developed from many discussions about 2020 election security given past reports of Russian hacktivist groups interfering with the 2016 U.S. election.  In Operation Raging Mammoth, users are tasked to monitor voting-related systems. In order to identify anomalies, players must first establish a baseline of normal activity and configurations. Any changes to administrator access or attempt to modify voter registration information must be quickly detected and reported to authorities. Like all Project Ares Missions, the exercise aligns with NIST/NICE work roles, specifically Cyber Defense Analyst, Cyber Defense Incident Responder, Threat/Warning analyst.

Battle Rooms 19 and 20 focuses on using Splunk software to assist IT and security teams to get the most out of their security tools by enabling log aggregation of event data from across an environment into a single repository of critical security insights. Teaching cyber pros how to configure and use this tool helps them identify issues faster so they can resolve them more efficiently to stop threats and attacks.

Battle Room 21 teaches cmdlet lightweight commands used in PowerShell.  PowerShell is a command-line (CLI) scripting language developed by Microsoft to simplify automation and configuration management, consisting of a command-line shell and associated scripting language. With PowerShell, network analysts can obtain all the information they need to solve problems they detect in an environment. Microsoft notes that PowerShell also makes learning other programming languages like C# easier.

Embracing Cloud Capabilities for Continual Cyber Training

Circadence embraces all the capabilities the cloud provides and is pleased to launch the latest version of Project Ares that furthers our vision to provide sustainable, scalable, adaptable cyber training and learning opportunities to professionals so they can combat evolving threats in their workplace and in their personal lives.

As this upward trend in cloud utilization becomes ever-more prevalent, security teams of all sizes need to adapt their strategies to acknowledge the adoption of the cloud and train persistently in Project Ares. You can bet that as more people convene in the cloud, malicious hackers are not far behind them, looking for ways to exploit it. By continually innovating in Project Ares, we hope professionals all over the globe can better manage their networks in the cloud and protect them from attackers.

Predictions for Cyber Security in 2020

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The dynamic world of cyber security is prompting a new shift in focus for security execs and frontline defenders as we head into a new year in 2020. Given the rapid pace by which enterprises have adopted Cloud computing services to improve operations, the frequency of threats and attack methods, and the widening skills gap facing many industries, we expect 2020 will finally be the Year of Preparedness & Cyber Proactivity—from the CISO, to the Director of Risk Management, to the Network Analyst professional—and we’ll tell you why.

A recent report from ICS2 noted that the cyber security industry now faces an estimated shortfall of 4.07 million cyber professionals. In the U.S. alone, the industry is expected to have more than 490,000 unfilled cyber positions in the coming years. While the great debate continues as to whether we really have a “skills gap” problem or if we need to loosen the reins on job requirements and lower candidate qualification expectations, one thing is for sure—today’s (and tomorrow’s) cyber professionals will need help in combatting imminent threats to harden cyber security in 2020. To facilitate their preparedness strategy, we envision proactive tools and resources will become more mainstream to help professionals do their jobs with greater efficiency leveraging automation, to support expanding security provisions, compliance requirements, and minimize the widening attack surfaces.

Automation will become the preferred way to support security operations

Whether a security manager has 1,000 defenders on their cyber team or one, automating certain administrative tasks for these individuals will be a goal focus in 2020. Directors, managers and cyber team leads understand that threats are getting so sophisticated that network defenders and security analysts need as much help as possible.

Our own Battle Room Design Team Lead Matt Suprenant anticipates enterprises will be finding ways to “automate responses to detections” observing at the Microsoft Ignite event in Nov. 2019 that Microsoft toolsets on display were designed with automation in mind.

“As we think about the future of cyber, we will see a combination of things start working together as we learn more about AI, SOAR, and other mechanisms by which we can augment today’s workforce.” ~ Battle Room Design Team Lead, Matt Suprenant

Cloud adoption will be growing across all security sectors

In 2019, we predicted more enterprises would shift to the cloud for a more seamless and elastic security experience. Reports indicate that about 90% of businesses today are using the cloud to conduct operations from simple file storage to sales transactions in the cloud. So what’s next? Security divisions will be leveraging the cloud to train their professionals on the latest cyber threats and attacks in 2020. Cyber training in the cloud will likely become one of the new ways Cloud computing will be leveraged in 2020 since teams need persistent and always-on access to training (moving away from the one-and-done on-site classroom-based training offerings of today). The future of cyber training will occur in the cloud.

Don’t believe us? Hear the benefits of training in the Cloud in our webinar.

Renewed focus on security awareness training for all employees

Human resource managers and risk and compliance managers will work more closely together to design their own security training programs to nurture incoming talent and existing staff. Another cyber security prediction in 2020 will indeed be around this topic, as HR managers and Risk and Compliance managers identify new ways to educate all employees (not just the IT staff) on cyber risks, attack methods, and how to spot suspicious emails (phishing attacks), links, website, and other digital assets related to endpoint security.

“I hope the prioritization of training and education continues to increase; I hope the prioritization of security as a pillar of someone’s organization continues to get recognition. I think we’re coming out of a phase where organization’s felt that could just ignore the elephant that’s stomping around their data center. I’m hopeful we’re moving into this position that people are being more generally aware [of their digital activity online], not just on paper, but that [cyber security readiness and training] needs funding and collaboration…The industry is moving toward recognition that this is where priorities lie.” ~ Megan Daudelin, Team Lead, Curriculum Development

Election Security will dominate discussions

Years ago, ballot fidelity was the issue to solve but now, election security is the hot ticket item to address in cyber security in 2020. The breadth and diversity of counties means election security isn’t managed the same way, putting all elections at greater risk of interference. Russian cyber criminals have been able to gain access to voting systems around the country, most notably in the 2016 election. As we head into an election year, election security pros will be understanding vulnerabilities in voting machines and (ideally) replacing such machines using congressional funds, which granted $380 million to upgrade old voting systems.

We also anticipate both election volunteers and frontline election security tally monitors and processors will desire more cyber training and education to ensure they’re doing their part to stay vigilant against any suspicious activity that comes in their purview.

Increased Attacks on IT/OT automated systems, state local governments

Municipal ransomware attacks on cities was a big occurrence in 2019 and we don’t envision it’s going to stop in 2020. A CNN news article reported that over 140 local governments, police stations and hospitals were held hostage by ransomware attacks in 2019. As more entities run by and are funded/informed by state and local government organizations, automated operations of network security will be more prevalent to streamline workforces and workloads, thus, increasing the chances of cyber attacks occurring on those systems. To prevent data breaches and make cyber readiness a top priority, live fire cyber exercises will be leveraged to bring together cyber security experts across departments and teams, divisions and functional areas of critical infrastructure and government operations.

We will continue to see a rise in targeted ransomware attacks, especially against small to medium size public entities like utilities, governments, and hospitals. Too many are just paying the ransom because it is far cheaper to do that than fix it, even if you have backups. ~ Paul Ellis, Senior Product Manager

What do we do to harden cyber security in 2020?

Educate, educate, educate. Train. Train. Train.

That is our recommendation for security leaders, managers, and frontline defenders who are heading into 2020 trying their best to anticipate the next threat vector or patch a vulnerability.

The more companies can educate their non-technical staff about cyber issues and suspicious activity while IT teams and security divisions regularly train/upskill their defenders the better off enterprises will be.

It’s important to remember that cyber security in 2020 and beyond is not a “do this thing and you’re secure” effort. Cyber security and hardening posture is a JOURNEY, not to be taken lightly or without concern.

For enterprise security teams who want to understand more about how Project Ares can support cyber learning in mission scenarios that address election security, ICS/SCADA systems, and experience learning against automated adversaries in the Cloud, schedule a demonstration of Project Ares today.

For HR managers and Risk and Compliance directors seeking ways to implement a company-wide security awareness training program using gamification, check out our inCyt platform (Available soon).

 

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Rethinking cyber learning—consider gamification

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This post originally appeared on Microsoft’s Security Blog, authored by Mark McIntyre, Executive Security Advisor, Enterprise Cybersecurity Group

Living our Mission Blog Series: How Tony Hammerling, Curriculum Developer, Orchestrates a Symphony of Cyber Learning at Circadence

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Circadence’s Curriculum Developer Tony Hammerling wasn’t always interested in a career in cyber—but he was certainly made for it. In fact, he initially wanted to be a musician! While his musical talents didn’t pan out for him early in his career, he quickly learned how to create unique harmonies using computers instead of instruments…After joining the Navy in 1995 as a Cryptologist and Morse Code operator, he transitioned to a Cryptologic Technician Networks professional where he performed network analysis and social network/persona analysis. It was there he learned more offensive and defensive strategies pertinent to cyber security and was introduced to network types and communication patterns. He moved to Maryland to do offensive analysis and then retired in Pensacola, Florida. The world of cyber grew on Tony and he enjoyed the digital accompaniment of the work it offered.

For the last few years, now settled in Pensacola, Florida, Tony is a critical part of Circadence’s Curriculum Team, working alongside colleagues to develop learning objectives and routes for players using platforms like inCyt, Project Ares, and other cyber games like NexAgent, Circadence’s immersive network exploration game. Currently, Tony and his team are focused on building out learning of network essentials in NexAgent, and “…are bridging the gap between what new IT professional’s learn in NexAgent and getting them onto more advanced learning pathways in Project Ares,” says Tony.

“We’re starting to introduce new content for [Project Ares] battle rooms so users coming out of NexAgent can have an understanding of the tools and techniques needed for more advanced learning of cyber defense—and actually apply those tools and techniques in realistic scenarios.”

As the technical subject matter expert for cyber curriculum, Tony digs into the details with his work—and that’s where he shines. Tony and his team ensure that user learning is reflective of today’s cyber attacks and vulnerabilities. In the next iteration of NexAgent, users will be able to focus on network segmentation using election security as the theme for game-play. From separating election polling servers to working with registration databases to designing networks to prevent election fraud, learning becomes much more interesting for the end-user.

The most exciting part about Tony’s job is the diversity of material he gets to work on every day. One day he could be helping end-users of Project Ares identify fraudulent IP addresses in a battle room and another day he could be working on a full-scale technical design of a SCADA system modeled after a cyber incident at a Ukrainian power plant.

By understanding corporate demands for new content, Tony and his team have more direction to build out cyber learning curriculum that aligns to customer’s needs. He believes the technical training he’s able to support with learning material in Circadence’s platforms complements traditional cyber learning paths like obtaining certifications and attending off-site classes. The variety of learning options for users of all cyber ability levels (both technical and non-technical), gives professionals the opportunity to be more thoughtful in their day-to-day lives, more critical and discerning of vulnerabilities and systems, and more creative in how they address threats.

“Knowing that people are able to come into a Circadence product and learn something that they didn’t know before or refine specific knowledge into an application/skill-based path is exciting. I don’t think too much of the greater impact my work provides—but perhaps 10 years down the line when we can say ‘we were the first to gamify and scale cyber training,’ it will mean so much more.”

We are grateful for the unique talents Tony brings to the Circadence family of products and how he’s able to craft learning “chords” that when orchestrated, provide a symphonic concerto of cyber learning activity—empowering cyber professionals across the globe with relevant, persistent, and scalable cyber training options to suit their security needs.

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Operation Gratitude: 5 Reasons to Give Thanks for Cyber Security

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With daily breaches impacting business operations and security, it’s easy to forget about the good ways that cyber security keeps us safe behind the scenes. This holiday season, we’re giving thanks to cyber security and all that it does to make our lives easier and more secure with what we’re calling Operation Gratitude (inspired by our Project Ares missions, uniquely titled “Operation Goatherd” or “Operation Desert Whale”). #OperationGratitude is a rally cry for security professionals and business leaders to remember the positive aspects of cyber security and share those positive thoughts with each other. Too often we live in fear from cyber attacks and persistent threats, and while, there is always cause for concern, we must remember how advances in the field have equally made aspects of our digital life easier. We’re thankful for these advances in cyber security:

  1. Two-factor authentication – This tool helps to keep you secure by requiring two different credentials before allowing you to gain access to sensitive information online. One example of this would be when you log in to check your bank statements and it prompts you to not only enter your username and password, but also to check your phone and enter a verification code that was texted to you. You will normally see this security precaution used when logging into an account from a new device. The great part about it is, it’s widely known and used by everyone from CISOs to high school kids.
  2. HTTP(S) – You’ve likely seen this appear when visiting a URL online, usually showing up just before the “www” and website name. Http means HyperText Transfer Protocol. HTTP is the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web, which defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands. The “S” is for security, and this little letter means that all communication between your browser and your website is encrypted for your protection. This means that sites utilizing https are prioritizing your safety while performing sensitive transactions online!
  3. Personal digital responsibility – These days the average consumer is more connected than ever. With our lives relying on smartphones, computers, tablets, and a multitude of IoT devices, we are entrenched in cyber every single day. This reliance requires us to practice personal digital responsibility, or often called digital citizenship—that is, the ability to participate safely, intelligently, productively, and responsibly in the digital world. Just because we are more connected does not necessarily mean that we are more aware of cyber risks, however, initiatives such as Cyber Security Awareness Month (in October) are helping to increase awareness by promoting cyber citizenship and education. Circadence is proud to contribute to the security awareness and digital responsibility effort with the soon-to-be-available inCyt, a security awareness game of strategy that helps bring cyber safe practices into the workplace and cultivates good cyber hygiene for all (and you don’t have to be a technical expert to use it).
  4. Corporate security awareness trainings – Given that 25% of all data breaches in the U.S in 2018 were due to carelessness or user error, it is critical for companies of all sizes to engage their employees in persistent cyber training. Thank goodness there is an increase in organizations such as the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) that provide risk assessments and security training to organizations across the U.S.
  5. Increased security collaboration – With more than 4,000 ransomware attacks alone occurring daily, no one business can mitigate the increasing amount of cyber risks present in today’s threatscape. It is more important than ever for businesses to share knowledge from breaches they have experienced and stand together to fight cyber crime, which is exactly what they’re doing! Nowadays these partnerships are being formed not only to share information, but to conduct live fire cyber readiness exercises. One such initiative is DHS’s National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center(NCCIC) – a 24/7 cyber situational awareness, management and response center serving as a national nexus of cyber and communications integration for the federal government, intelligence community, and law enforcement. The NCCIC also shares information among public and private sector partners to build awareness of vulnerabilities, incidents, and mitigations.

So, as you prepare your Thanksgiving meal from recipes pulled up on your tablet, with holiday music playing from your smart phone, and timers set by Alexa to ensure the juiciest turkey and tastiest pies, remember to give thanks for cyber security. We certainly are!

 

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Photo by Pro Church Media on Unsplash

Why Cyber Security is Important for Higher Education Institutions

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It might surprise you to know that the education industry is a prime target for malicious hackers. While threats in this sector are on the rise, many education institutions are not prepared for a cyber attack nor do they know how to recover from one. In fact, there were 122 cyber attacks last year at 119 K-12 public education institutions, averaging out to an attack every three days. A 2018 Education Cyber Security Report published by SecurityScorecard also found that of 17 industries, the education sector ranked dead last in total cyber security safety. Schools are leaving themselves open to student and faculty identity theft, stolen intellectual property, and extremely high cost data breach reconciliation. In fact, a study done by the Ponemon Institute shows the average cost of a data breach in the education sector is $141 per record leaked.

This industry faces some unique cyber security challenges:

  • Historically, this industry is based on the free exchange of information, i.e the philosophy that information should be readily available to all. The use of computers and internet in education has allowed information to be stored and accessed in many different ways, creating vulnerabilities in storage, network security, and user error which leaves systems susceptible to hacks.
  • Students and staff may have limited technical skills and prowess to know how to stay safe online.
  • Online education systems are highly distributed across multiple schools in a district or across state lines, making it easier to infect one system to gain access to all.
  • Computer systems used by schools often lack a single application, or “source of truth” to safely manage student and employee identities.
  • There’s a significant change in the user population every year due to students graduating and new students enrolling, making it difficult to track who is using certain resources and who has access to them.
  • Remote access is often required, with students and parents accessing systems from home computers and smartphones. When you access an online resource repeatedly from potentially vulnerable or unsecure networks, it creates more opportunity for hacks.

So how can educational institutions better protect themselves against looming cyber threats?

  • Shift the focus to prevention instead of mitigation – by making the focus on securing data before an attack happens rather than after, organizations will be better prepared to protect students and staff against a breach.
    • IT directors and security operators within educational institutions would be wise to consider persistent training solutions for their teams to optimize existing cyber skills so they don’t go “stale” after a period of time.
    • Likewise, perform a security audit and work across departments to understand all the digital systems in place (financial, teacher, student portals, etc.) and where vulnerabilities might exist.
    • HR departments of institutions should consider updating or adopting employee security awareness training to ensure every education-employed professional working on a computer understands the basics of cyber security and how to stay safe online.
  • Minimize internal threats – Verizon’s 2019 Data Breach Investigations Report found that nearly 32% of breaches involved phishing and that human error was the causation in 21% of breaches. Proper and continued training and awareness around security issues is key in preventing possible attacks.
  • Make cyber security a priority in IT budgeting – Schools and other educational institutions need to recognize the growing cyber threatscape and prioritize allocating funds to training tools, IT teams, and continued education for internal staff.

Circadence is here to help. Our immersive, gamified cyber learning platform, Project Ares, can help ensure that your cyber team is ready to defend against malicious attacks, and our inCyt product (coming soon!) will keep everyone else in your organization up to snuff on cyber defense and offense. We pair gamification with prolonged learning methods to make learning and retaining cyber security tactics simple and fun for all. Don’t let your institution and students be next in line for a breach–think inCyt, and Project Ares when you think cyber security for the education sector!

If you’re still looking for more information on education and cyber security, check out these handy references:

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