Predictions for Cyber Security in 2020

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The dynamic world of cyber security is prompting a new shift in focus for security execs and frontline defenders as we head into a new year in 2020. Given the rapid pace by which enterprises have adopted Cloud computing services to improve operations, the frequency of threats and attack methods, and the widening skills gap facing many industries, we expect 2020 will finally be the Year of Preparedness & Cyber Proactivity—from the CISO, to the Director of Risk Management, to the Network Analyst professional—and we’ll tell you why.

A recent report from ICS2 noted that the cyber security industry now faces an estimated shortfall of 4.07 million cyber professionals. In the U.S. alone, the industry is expected to have more than 490,000 unfilled cyber positions in the coming years. While the great debate continues as to whether we really have a “skills gap” problem or if we need to loosen the reins on job requirements and lower candidate qualification expectations, one thing is for sure—today’s (and tomorrow’s) cyber professionals will need help in combatting imminent threats to harden cyber security in 2020. To facilitate their preparedness strategy, we envision proactive tools and resources will become more mainstream to help professionals do their jobs with greater efficiency leveraging automation, to support expanding security provisions, compliance requirements, and minimize the widening attack surfaces.

Automation will become the preferred way to support security operations

Whether a security manager has 1,000 defenders on their cyber team or one, automating certain administrative tasks for these individuals will be a goal focus in 2020. Directors, managers and cyber team leads understand that threats are getting so sophisticated that network defenders and security analysts need as much help as possible.

Our own Battle Room Design Team Lead Matt Suprenant anticipates enterprises will be finding ways to “automate responses to detections” observing at the Microsoft Ignite event in Nov. 2019 that Microsoft toolsets on display were designed with automation in mind.

“As we think about the future of cyber, we will see a combination of things start working together as we learn more about AI, SOAR, and other mechanisms by which we can augment today’s workforce.” ~ Battle Room Design Team Lead, Matt Suprenant

Cloud adoption will be growing across all security sectors

In 2019, we predicted more enterprises would shift to the cloud for a more seamless and elastic security experience. Reports indicate that about 90% of businesses today are using the cloud to conduct operations from simple file storage to sales transactions in the cloud. So what’s next? Security divisions will be leveraging the cloud to train their professionals on the latest cyber threats and attacks in 2020. Cyber training in the cloud will likely become one of the new ways Cloud computing will be leveraged in 2020 since teams need persistent and always-on access to training (moving away from the one-and-done on-site classroom-based training offerings of today). The future of cyber training will occur in the cloud.

Don’t believe us? Hear the benefits of training in the Cloud in our webinar.

Renewed focus on security awareness training for all employees

Human resource managers and risk and compliance managers will work more closely together to design their own security training programs to nurture incoming talent and existing staff. Another cyber security prediction in 2020 will indeed be around this topic, as HR managers and Risk and Compliance managers identify new ways to educate all employees (not just the IT staff) on cyber risks, attack methods, and how to spot suspicious emails (phishing attacks), links, website, and other digital assets related to endpoint security.

“I hope the prioritization of training and education continues to increase; I hope the prioritization of security as a pillar of someone’s organization continues to get recognition. I think we’re coming out of a phase where organization’s felt that could just ignore the elephant that’s stomping around their data center. I’m hopeful we’re moving into this position that people are being more generally aware [of their digital activity online], not just on paper, but that [cyber security readiness and training] needs funding and collaboration…The industry is moving toward recognition that this is where priorities lie.” ~ Megan Daudelin, Team Lead, Curriculum Development

Election Security will dominate discussions

Years ago, ballot fidelity was the issue to solve but now, election security is the hot ticket item to address in cyber security in 2020. The breadth and diversity of counties means election security isn’t managed the same way, putting all elections at greater risk of interference. Russian cyber criminals have been able to gain access to voting systems around the country, most notably in the 2016 election. As we head into an election year, election security pros will be understanding vulnerabilities in voting machines and (ideally) replacing such machines using congressional funds, which granted $380 million to upgrade old voting systems.

We also anticipate both election volunteers and frontline election security tally monitors and processors will desire more cyber training and education to ensure they’re doing their part to stay vigilant against any suspicious activity that comes in their purview.

Increased Attacks on IT/OT automated systems, state local governments

Municipal ransomware attacks on cities was a big occurrence in 2019 and we don’t envision it’s going to stop in 2020. A CNN news article reported that over 140 local governments, police stations and hospitals were held hostage by ransomware attacks in 2019. As more entities run by and are funded/informed by state and local government organizations, automated operations of network security will be more prevalent to streamline workforces and workloads, thus, increasing the chances of cyber attacks occurring on those systems. To prevent data breaches and make cyber readiness a top priority, live fire cyber exercises will be leveraged to bring together cyber security experts across departments and teams, divisions and functional areas of critical infrastructure and government operations.

We will continue to see a rise in targeted ransomware attacks, especially against small to medium size public entities like utilities, governments, and hospitals. Too many are just paying the ransom because it is far cheaper to do that than fix it, even if you have backups. ~ Paul Ellis, Senior Product Manager

What do we do to harden cyber security in 2020?

Educate, educate, educate. Train. Train. Train.

That is our recommendation for security leaders, managers, and frontline defenders who are heading into 2020 trying their best to anticipate the next threat vector or patch a vulnerability.

The more companies can educate their non-technical staff about cyber issues and suspicious activity while IT teams and security divisions regularly train/upskill their defenders the better off enterprises will be.

It’s important to remember that cyber security in 2020 and beyond is not a “do this thing and you’re secure” effort. Cyber security and hardening posture is a JOURNEY, not to be taken lightly or without concern.

For enterprise security teams who want to understand more about how Project Ares can support cyber learning in mission scenarios that address election security, ICS/SCADA systems, and experience learning against automated adversaries in the Cloud, schedule a demonstration of Project Ares today.

For HR managers and Risk and Compliance directors seeking ways to implement a company-wide security awareness training program using gamification, check out our inCyt platform (Available soon).

 

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Rethinking cyber learning—consider gamification

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This post originally appeared on Microsoft’s Security Blog, authored by Mark McIntyre, Executive Security Advisor, Enterprise Cybersecurity Group

Living our Mission Blog Series: How Tony Hammerling, Curriculum Developer, Orchestrates a Symphony of Cyber Learning at Circadence

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Circadence’s Curriculum Developer Tony Hammerling wasn’t always interested in a career in cyber—but he was certainly made for it. In fact, he initially wanted to be a musician! While his musical talents didn’t pan out for him early in his career, he quickly learned how to create unique harmonies using computers instead of instruments…After joining the Navy in 1995 as a Cryptologist and Morse Code operator, he transitioned to a Cryptologic Technician Networks professional where he performed network analysis and social network/persona analysis. It was there he learned more offensive and defensive strategies pertinent to cyber security and was introduced to network types and communication patterns. He moved to Maryland to do offensive analysis and then retired in Pensacola, Florida. The world of cyber grew on Tony and he enjoyed the digital accompaniment of the work it offered.

For the last few years, now settled in Pensacola, Florida, Tony is a critical part of Circadence’s Curriculum Team, working alongside colleagues to develop learning objectives and routes for players using platforms like inCyt, Project Ares, and other cyber games like NexAgent, Circadence’s immersive network exploration game. Currently, Tony and his team are focused on building out learning of network essentials in NexAgent, and “…are bridging the gap between what new IT professional’s learn in NexAgent and getting them onto more advanced learning pathways in Project Ares,” says Tony.

“We’re starting to introduce new content for [Project Ares] battle rooms so users coming out of NexAgent can have an understanding of the tools and techniques needed for more advanced learning of cyber defense—and actually apply those tools and techniques in realistic scenarios.”

As the technical subject matter expert for cyber curriculum, Tony digs into the details with his work—and that’s where he shines. Tony and his team ensure that user learning is reflective of today’s cyber attacks and vulnerabilities. In the next iteration of NexAgent, users will be able to focus on network segmentation using election security as the theme for game-play. From separating election polling servers to working with registration databases to designing networks to prevent election fraud, learning becomes much more interesting for the end-user.

The most exciting part about Tony’s job is the diversity of material he gets to work on every day. One day he could be helping end-users of Project Ares identify fraudulent IP addresses in a battle room and another day he could be working on a full-scale technical design of a SCADA system modeled after a cyber incident at a Ukrainian power plant.

By understanding corporate demands for new content, Tony and his team have more direction to build out cyber learning curriculum that aligns to customer’s needs. He believes the technical training he’s able to support with learning material in Circadence’s platforms complements traditional cyber learning paths like obtaining certifications and attending off-site classes. The variety of learning options for users of all cyber ability levels (both technical and non-technical), gives professionals the opportunity to be more thoughtful in their day-to-day lives, more critical and discerning of vulnerabilities and systems, and more creative in how they address threats.

“Knowing that people are able to come into a Circadence product and learn something that they didn’t know before or refine specific knowledge into an application/skill-based path is exciting. I don’t think too much of the greater impact my work provides—but perhaps 10 years down the line when we can say ‘we were the first to gamify and scale cyber training,’ it will mean so much more.”

We are grateful for the unique talents Tony brings to the Circadence family of products and how he’s able to craft learning “chords” that when orchestrated, provide a symphonic concerto of cyber learning activity—empowering cyber professionals across the globe with relevant, persistent, and scalable cyber training options to suit their security needs.

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Will Artificial Intelligence Replace Cyber Security Jobs?

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The cyber security workforce gap continues to grow, and the availability of qualified cyber professionals is predicted to decrease in the coming years. In fact, a Cyber Security Workforce Study from the International Information System Security Certification Consortium predicts a shortfall of 1.8 million cyber security workers by 2022. Some resources claim upwards of 3.5 million within the next two years too. While this can feel like impending doom and gloom for the industry, AI, or artificial intelligence, can help to quell the concerns while empowering existing cyber workers.

While many other industries have seen robotic systems replacing the need for human workers, this doesn’t appear to be the case in cyber security. Humans are able to accomplish more when supported by the right set of tools. Allowing AI to support and react to human behavior allows cyber professionals to focus on critical tasks, utilize their expertise to analyze potential threats, and to make informed decisions when rectifying a breach.

How? AI can do the legwork of processing and analyzing data in order to help inform human decision making. If we were to rely completely on AI to manage security risks, it could lead to more vulnerabilities because such systems have high risks for things like program biases, exploitation, and yielding false data. Nevertheless, if utilize and deployed correctly for cyber teams, AI has the ability to automate routine tasks for processionals and augment their responsibilities to lighten the workload.

Learn more about AI’s role in cyber security professional training in our on-demand webinar!

So, is AI going to take over the jobs of seasoned cyber pros? The answer is no; however, AI will drastically change the kinds of work cyber engineers are doing. In order for IT teams to successfully implement AI technologies, they will need a new category of experts to train the AI technology, run it, and analyze the results. While AI may be great for processing large amounts of data or replacing autonomous manual tasks, it will never be able to replace a security analyst’s insights or understanding of the field. There are some data points that require a level of interpretation that even computers and algorithms can’t quite support yet.

AI can help to fill the workforce gap in the cyber security sector, although it may create a need for new skillsets to be learned by humans in the industry. AI and the human workforce are not in conflict with one another in this field, in fact, they complement each other. Thefuture is bright for AI and humans to work in tandem at the front lines of cyber defense.

For more information, check out our white paper on AI and gamification!

 

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Living our Mission Blog Series: Supporting Cyber Red Teams, with Consultations and Pen Testing from Josiah Bryan

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While Circadence is proud to be a pioneer that has developed innovative cyber learning products to strengthen readiness at all levels of business, there’s one professional area at Circadence that doesn’t tend to get the limelight, until now. Meet Josiah Bryan, principle Security Architect for Circadence’s security consultation services, aptly called Advanced Red Team Intrusion Capabilities (ARTIC for short). For almost two years, Josiah has provided support and services to Red Teams around the country, those leading-edge professionals who test and challenge the security readiness of a system by assuming adversarial roles and hacker points of view.

Josiah enjoys doing penetration testing and exploit development with Red Teams at a variety of companies to help them understand what a bad actor might try to do to compromise their security systems.

But Josiah wasn’t always on the offensive side of cyber security in his professional career. He was first introduced to the “blue team,” or the defensive side of cyber, when he began participating in Capture the Flag competitions across the U.S. during his time as a computer science student at Charleston Southern University. Those competitions also exposed him to the offensive side of security training and he never looked back.

After graduation, he took a job in San Diego with the U.S. Navy as a DoD civilian, finding vulnerabilities in critical infrastructure, which were then reported up to the Department of Homeland Security.

“Learning how the DoD operates internally and how they conduct penetration tests/security evaluations was an extremely valuable skill and great background for my current job at Circadence,” he says.

In addition to consulting with Red Teams, Josiah uses a variety of tools to show and tell companies about existing vulnerabilities. For example, badge scanners that let people gain access to a facility or room are quite common devices for Josiah and his team to test for customers. He might also use USB implants that provide full access to workstations and wireless signal identification devices.

“We show people how easy it is to get credentials off of someone’s badge and gain access to an area,” he says. “They never believe we will find vulnerabilities but when we do, they realize how much they need to do to improve their cyber readiness,” he adds.

But, ultimately Josiah’s favorite part of his job is the level of research and analysis he gets to do. “We are a research team, first,” he says. “We are pushing the boundaries in cybersecurity and discovering new ways that bad actors might take advantage of companies, before they actually do.  It’s a great feeling to help companies and Red Teams see the ‘light’ before the hackers get them,” he adds.

Whether circumventing a security measure or patching a system, Josiah’s contributions to the field are significant.

“Finding new ways to help people understand the importance of strong cyber hygiene is fulfilling,” he says. “We can’t stress it enough in today’s culture where attacks are so dynamic and hackers are always looking for ways to take advantage of companies.”

To stay on the cutting edge of Red Team support, Josiah follows Circadence’s philosophy to persistently learn new ways to protect people and companies. “Any company is only as good as the least trained person,” Josiah says.

 

How Cyber Security Can Be Improved

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Every day we get more interconnected and that naturally widens the threat surface for cybercriminals. In order to protect vulnerabilities and keep pace with hacker methods, security – and non-security professionals must understand how to protect themselves (and their companies). And that involves looking for new ways to improve cyber security. To start, we believe cyber security can be improved by focusing on three areas: enterprise-wide cyber awareness programs, within cyber teams via persistent training, and in communication between the C-suite and the CISO. Check out our recommendations below and if you have a strategy that worked to improve cyber security in your company or organization, we’d love to hear about it.

Company-Wide Security Awareness Programs

Regardless of company size or budget, every person employed at a business should understand fundamental cyber concepts so they can protect themselves from malicious hackers. Failure to do so places the employee and the company at risk of being attacked and could result in significant monetary and reputation damages.

Simple knowledge of what a phishing email looks like, what an unsecured website looks like, and implications of sharing personal information on social media are all topics that can be addressed in a company-wide security program. Further, staff should understand how hackers work and what kinds of tactics they use to get information on a victim to exploit. Reports vary but a most recent article from ThreatPost notes that phishing attempts have doubled in 2018 with new scams on the rise every day.

But where and how should companies start building a security awareness program—not to mention a program that staff will actually take seriously and participate in?

We believe in the power of gamified learning to engage employees in cyber security best practices.

Our mobile app inCyt helps novice and non-technical professionals learn the ins and outs of cyber security from hacking methods to understanding cyber definitions. The game allows employees to play against one another in a healthy, yet competitive, manner. Players have digital “hackables” they have to protect in the game while trying to steal other player’s assets for vulnerabilities to exploit. The back and forth game play teaches learners how and why attacks occur in the first place and where vulnerabilities exist on a variety of digital networks.

By making the learning fun, it shifts the preconceived attitude of “have to do” to “want to do.” When an employee learns the fundamentals of cyber security not only are they empowering themselves to protect their own data, which translates into improved personal data cyber hygiene, but it also adds value for them as professionals. Companies are more confident when employees work with vigilance and security at the forefront.

Benefits of company-wide security awareness training

  • Lowers risk – Prevents an internal employee cyber mishap with proper education and training to inform daily activities.
  • Strengthens workforce – Existing security protocols are hardened to keep the entire staff aware of daily vulnerabilities and prevention.
  • Improved practices – Cultivate good cyber hygiene by growing cyber aptitude in a safe, virtual environment, instead of trial and error on workplace networks.

For more information about company-wide cyber learning, read about our award-winning mobile app inCyt.

Persistent (Not Periodic) Cyber Training

For cyber security professionals like network analysts, IT directors, CISOs, and incident responders, knowledge of the latest hacker methods and ways to protect and defend, govern, and mitigate threats is key. Today’s periodic training conducted at off-site training courses has and continues to be the option of choice—but the financial costs and time away from the frontlines makes it a less-than-fruitful ROI for leaders looking to harden their posture productively and efficiently.

Further, periodic cyber security training classes are often dull, static, PowerPoint-driven or prescriptive, step-by-step instructor-driven—meaning the material is often too outdates to be relevant to today’s threats—and the learning is passive. There’s minimal opportunity for hands-on learning to apply learned concepts in a virtualized, safe setting. These roadblocks make periodic learning ineffective and unfortunately companies are spending thousands of dollars every quarter or month to upskill professionals without knowing if it’s money well spent. That’s frustrating!

What if companies could track cyber team performance to identify gaps in security skills—and do so on emulated networks to enrich the learning experience?

We believe persistent training on a cyber range is the modern response for companies to better align with today’s evolving threats. Cyber ranges allow cyber teams to engage in skill building in a “safe” environment. Sophisticated ranges should be able to scale as companies grow in security posture too. Our Project Ares cyber learning platform helps professionals develop frontier learning capabilities on mirrored networks for a more authentic training experience. Running on Microsoft Azure, enterprise, government and academic IT teams can persistently training on their own networks safely using their own tools to “train as they would fight.”

Browser-based, Project Ares also allows professionals to train on their terms – wherever they are. Artificial intelligence via natural language processing and machine learning support players on the platform by acting as both automated adversaries to challenge trainees in skill, and as an in-game advisor to support trainee progression through a cyber exercise.

The gamified element of cyber training keeps professionals engaged while building skill. Digital badges, leaderboards, levels, and team-based mission scenarios build communicative skills, technical skills, and increase information retention in this active-learning model of training.

Benefits of persistent cyber training

Gamifying cyber training is the next evolution of learning for professionals who are either already in the field or curious to start a career in cyber security. The benefits are noteworthy:

  • Increased engagement, sense of control and self-efficacy
  • Adoption of new initiatives
  • Increased satisfaction with internal communication
  • Development of personal and organizational capabilities and resources
  • Increased personal satisfaction and employee retention
  • Enhanced productivity, monitoring and decision making

For more information about gamified cyber training, read about our award-winning platform Project Ares.

CISO Involvement in C-Suite Decision-Making

Communication processes between the C-suite and CISO need to be more transparent and frequent to achieve better alignment between cyber risk and business risk.

Many CISOs are currently challenged in reporting to the C-suite because of the very technical nature and reputation of cyber security. It’s often perceived as “too technical” for laymen, non-cyber professionals. However, it doesn’t have to be that way.

C-suite execs can understand their business’ cyber risks in the context of business risk to see how the two are inter-related and impact each other.

A CISO is typically concerned about the security of the business as a whole and if a breach occurs at the sake of a new product launch, service addition, or employee productivity, it’s his or her reputation on the line.

The CISO perspective is, if ever a company is deploying a new product or service, security should be involved from the get-go. Having CISOs brought into discussions about business initiatives early on is key to ensuring there are not security “add ons” brought in too late in the game. Also, actualizing the cost of a breach on the company in terms of dollar amounts can also capture the attention of the C-suite.

Furthermore, CISOs are measuring risk severity and breaking it down for the C-suite to help them understand the business value of cyber.  To achieve this alignment, CISOs are finding unique ways to do remediation or cyber security monitoring to reduce their workloads enough so they can prioritize communications with execs and keep all facets of the company safe from the employees it employs to the technologies it adopts to function.

Improving Cyber Security for the Future

Better communications between execs and security leaders, continual cyber training for teams, and company-wide cyber learning are a few suggestions we’ve talked about today to help companies reduce their cyber risk and harden their posture. We’ve said it before and we will say it again: cyber security is everyone’s responsibility. And evolving threats in the age of digital transformation mean that we are always susceptible to attacks regardless of how many firewalls we put up or encryption codes we embed.

If we have a computer, a phone, an electronic device that can exchange information in some way to other parties, we are vulnerable to cyber attacks. Every bit and byte of information exchanged on a company network is up for grabs for hackers and the more technical, business, and non-technical professionals come together to educate and empower themselves to improve cyber hygiene practices, the more prepared they and their company assets will be when a hacker comes knocking on their digital door.

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Diversity in Cyber Security: Why It’s Important and How To Integrate It

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You may have heard that the cybersecurity skills gap is widening, and that there is a massive shortage of cyber professionals today. In fact, Cybersecurity Ventures predicts that there will be up to 3.5 million job openings in the field by 2021. In spite of the growing need for people in cyber, women continue to be underrepresented in the field.

According to major findings from the 2017 Global Information Security Workforce Study:

  • Women are globally underrepresented in the cybersecurity profession at 11%, much lower than the representation of women in the overall global workforce.
  • Globally, men are 4 times more likely to hold C-suite and executive-level positions, and 9 times more likely to hold managerial positions than women.
  • In 2016 women in cybersecurity earned less than men at every level.

It’s no surprise that women are the underdog across plenty of male-dominated industries. So why is it so important for women to close the gender gap in cyber?

We need diverse perspectives in cybersecurity

Firstly, cyber is an area that benefits greatly from utilizing people with diverse perspectives and histories to solve problems. As threat actors and black hat hackers often come from disparate backgrounds, the wider variety of people and experience that are defending our networks, the better the chances of success at protecting them.

Combat the stereotype that cyber is only for men

Secondly, as there are so many empty jobs in the field, it is ultimately detrimental for a factor like a gender to narrow the pool of people pursuing it. Unfortunately, the message is ingrained in women from a young age that tech and security are “masculine” professions, which results in a self-perpetuating cycle of unconscious bias against women in the field. These problems are difficult to fix because they are subtle and pervasive and often come back to issues in culture and education. In fact, an online survey, Beyond 11%, found that most women have ruled out cybersecurity as a potential job by the age of 15. This is unacceptable!

Everyone can learn cyber

Finally, there is a misconception that the cybersecurity industry is only for people with highly technical skills. Unfortunately, the “bad guy” hackers out there don’t require crazy technical skills to get to your personal information. Fortunately, being on the defensive lines don’t require them either. Cybersecurity is a highly trainable field and has a growing need for people in more positions than ever before, such as legal, marketing, and public policy – all of which women have proven to excel in. In fact, the communication skills, problem-solving and attention to detail skill sets needed to excel in cybersecurity are skills women possess and are really good at.

Introducing more women to cybersecurity


Programs and Events

Since many of these problems start for women from a young age and through somewhat unconscious societal and cultural constructs, it can feel like a daunting task to get women more involved in cyber. In order to combat these misconceptions, many programs and events have been put into place to provide young women with female role models in the cybersecurity field. Events such as the Women in Cybersecurity Seminar, Women in Cybersecurity Conference, and Cyber Day for Girls are just a small number of direct-action groups that companies like IBM have put in place to address the gender gap. Further cyber competitions like the Wicked6 Cyber Games, and organizations like the Women’s Society of Cyberjutsu and Girls Who Code are dedicated to introducing young women to cyber at that earlier age before they are told “it is not for them.”

Cybersecurity Mentorships and Internships

Mentorships and internships are another great way to introduce girls to other women in cybersecurity fields they may think are beyond their reach. Volunteers from tech companies have been going to summer camps specifically designed to encourage young girls to consider careers in STEM, such as the Tech Trek summer camp. Additionally, the Girl Scouts just introduced the first ever cybersecurity badge, which can be earned by completing curriculum and gamified learning around internet safety.

Persistent cyber career development

Another way we can support and retain women who choose cybersecurity roles is for companies have policies in place that ensure women do not miss out on opportunities to further their careers after having children. Things like flexible hours and the option to work from home can be key in maintaining a diverse and productive workforce. Hiring managers can also work to ensure equal employment opportunities when looking to hire for a new position. People from all backgrounds should feel welcome to apply for roles in this highly trainable and accessible field.

We need all hands-on deck now more than ever in cybersecurity, tech and STEM fields. Communicating to girls at a young age that technology isn’t just for their male counterparts, and that it can offer them a long and rewarding career, is essential in closing the gender and skills gap in cyber.

To learn more how to diversify the cybersecurity workforce from a strategic standpoint, read our other blog “Diversifying the Cybersecurity Workforce.” https://www.circadence.com/a-call-to-diversify-the-cybersecurity-workforce/

 

 

A Call to Diversify the Cybersecurity Workforce

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You’ve read about it, know it well, and can probably instantaneously identify one of today’s top cyber crises: the cybersecurity skills gap. It’s putting enterprises, governments and academic institutions at greater risk than ever because we don’t have enough professionals to mitigate, defend, and analyze incoming attacks and vulnerabilities. According to recent estimates, we are looking at the possibility of having as many as 3.5 million unfilled cybersecurity positions by 2021. The widening career gap is due in part to the lack of diversity in the industry.

And we’re not just talking about racial and ethnic diversity, we’re also talking about diversity of perspective, experience and skill sets. A recent CSIS survey of IT decisionmakers across eight countries found that 82% of employees reported a shortage of cybersecurity skills and 71% of IT decisionmakers believe this talent gap causes direct damage to their organizations[1]. It’s not just the technical skills like computer coding and threat detection that are needed, employers often find today’s cyber graduates are lacking essential soft skills too, like communication, problem-solving, and teamwork capabilities[2].

An ISC2 study notes, organizations are unable to equip their existing cyber staff with the education and authority needed to develop and enhance their skill sets—leaving us even more deprived of the diversity we desperately need in the cybersecurity sector. The more unique thinking, problem-solving and community representation we have in the cybersecurity space, the better we can tackle the malicious hacker mindset from multiple angles in efforts to get ahead of threats. Forbes assents, “Combining diverse skills, perspectives and situations is necessary to meet effectively the multi-faceted, dynamic challenges of security.”

In an interview with Security Boulevard, Circadence’s Vice President of Global Partnerships Keenan Skelly notes that as cybersecurity tools and technology evolve, specifically AI and machine learning, a problem begins to reveal itself as it relates to lack of diversity:

“The problem is that if you don’t have a diverse group of people training the Artificial Intelligence, then you’re transferring unconscious biases into the AI,” Keenan said. “What we really have to do…is make sure the group of people you have building your AI is diverse enough to be able to recognize these biases and get them out of the AI engineering process,” she added.

The good news is that is it never too late to build a more diverse workforce. Even if your organization cannot hire more people from different career backgrounds or varying skill sets, existing cyber teams can be further developed as professionals too. With the right learning environments that are both relevant and challenging to their thinking, tactics and techniques, current employees can develop a more diverse set of cyber competencies; all while co-learning with diverse teams around the world.

Companies can also build relationships with local educational institutions to communicate critical workforce needs to better align talent pipeline with industry needs, recommends a new study from the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Likewise, cyber professionals can be guest speakers or lecturers in local cyber courses and classrooms to communicate the same diversification needs in the industry.

While some experts say it’s too late to try and diversify the workforce in thinking, skill, and background, we beg to differ. If we give up now in diversifying our workforce, our technology and tools will outpace our ability to use it effectively, efficiently, and innovatively. It’s not too late. It starts with an open mind and “take action” sense of conviction.

[1] CSIS, Hacking the Skills Shortage (Santa Clara, CA: McAfee, July 2016), https://www.mcafee.com/enterprise/en-us/assets/reports/rp-hacking-skills-shortage.pdf. 

[2] Crumpler and Lewis, The Cybersecurity Workforce Gap, Center for Strategic and International Studies, January 2019.

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