New Year, New Threats: Top Cyber Threats Anticipated to Hit Big in 2020 for Enterprise Companies

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As we enter the New Year, one thing is certain: cyber attacks aren’t going anywhere. Enterprise companies have been tasked with defending their networks from unyielding cyber crooks who want a piece of the pie for themselves. What’s on the horizon for enterprise security threats in 2020? We’ve got a few predictions.

  • DeepFakes

    Deep Fake technology can create fake but incredibly realistic images, text, and videos. Computers can rapidly process numerous facial biometrics, and mathematically build or classify human features, to mimic a person or group of individuals for public manipulation. Bloomberg reports the tech is becoming so sophisticated, detecting a DeepFake video from a real one, is getting harder and harder to differentiate for viewers.

    While the technical benefits are impressive, underlying flaws inherent in all types of Deep Fake models represent a rapidly growing security weakness, which cyber criminals will exploit. It will be critical for businesses to understand the security risks presented by facial recognition and other biometric systems and educate themselves on the risks as well as hardening systems that require/use facial recognition.

  • API and Cloud vulnerabilities 

    An application programming interface (API) is an interface or communication protocol between different parts of a computer program intended to simplify the implementation and maintenance of software. APIs are an essential tool in cloud environments, acting as a service gateway to enable direct and indirect cloud software and infrastructure services to cloud users.

    A recent study showed more than three in four organizations treat API security differently than web app security, indicating API security readiness lags behind other aspects of application security. The study also reported that more than two-thirds of organizations expose APIs to the public to enable partners and external developers to tap into their software platforms and app ecosystems. Threat actors are following the growing number of organizations using API-enabled apps because APIs continue to be an easy – and vulnerable – means to access a treasure trove of sensitive data. Despite the fallout of large-scale breaches and ongoing threats, APIs often still reside outside of the application security infrastructure and are ignored by security processes and teams.

  • 5G Threats

    With the rollout of 5G continuing in 2020, we will see an increase in the volume and speed of data theft. The AT&T Cybersecurity Insights Report: Security at the Speed of 5G, shows that larger enterprises are not prepared for the security implications of 5G. The top cyber security concerns that came back in this report were:

  • Larger attack surface due to the massive increase in connectivity
  • Greater number of devices accessing the network
  • The extension of security policies
  • Authentication of a larger number and wider variety of devices.

As more 5G devices enter the network, organizations must prepare for the onslaught of added security threats.

  • Ransomware attacks evolve

    Ah, ransomware, seemingly every hacker’s favorite extortion tool. According to McAfee Labs 2020 Threat Prediction Report, the increase of targeted ransomware has created a growing demand for compromised company networks. This demand is met by criminals who specialize in penetrating company networks and sell complete network access in one go.

“I expect that the ransomware used will continue to become more advanced. I am concerned that some threats have just become more stealthy, or are working toward that, and that readily available ransomware will enable even novice criminals to maintain stealth. Organizations are spending more resources to defend against ransomware, which might drive out a few of the lesser players, but any organization with resources will still see ransomware attacks happen as a fast and easy way for financial gain, so hackers will continue to pursue advancements.” ~ Karl Gosset, VP of Content Development at Circadence

It’s clear that the threat landscape will continue to grow and become more sophisticated in the coming year, which means it’s time for businesses to step up their security game.

Circadence believes that the best way to do this is through cyber learning games themselves! Our flagship product, Project Ares, delivers real-world attack scenarios in a safe, online range environment and allows users to practice and hone their cyber skills through the use of games. With missions specific to enterprise threats, such as Operation Crimson Wolf and Operation Desert Whale, Project Ares will ready your organization for any looming threats like these. By using a gamified cyber learning platform like this for your security teams in 2020, you can readily pop some champagne and dance the night away, knowing your enterprise is better protected in the new year.

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Human Resources Takes on Cyber Readiness: How to Mitigate Cyber Risks with Security Awareness Training

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Every year hackers come out of the woodwork to target various companies, specifically around the holiday season. In fact, cyber attacks are estimated to increase by as much as 50 – 60% over the holidays. With staff often spread thin and consumers taking advantage of online shopping and banking for added convenience, the timing is perfect for HR professionals to stay vigilant with how they onboard new employees with cyber education while encouraging good cyber hygiene among existing colleagues. Understanding the risks employees come across while online, how to train them to detect and mitigate these risks, and how you as an HR manager can ensure continued efforts to harden security posture will make you a cyber safety hero this holiday season!

While IT and cyber professionals are primarily responsible for securing a company’s networks and ensuring teams are up to snuff, the reality is that cyber risk extends beyond what occurs in the server room. Human error continues to be one of the top reasons cyber attacks are successful. This means that not only do security teams need to be trained, but cyber training across every department, with every employee who works on a computer, is essential to obtain and maintain good cyber hygiene across the company. If every employee in your organization understands how their actions can impact overall company security, more personal responsibility will be taken to maintain cyber safety.

Don’t fret! HR professionals need not be masters in cyber security. There are great tools out there to help anyone learn the basics and be able to share their foundational learning with others. So, what are some of the things you can learn and train employees on to mitigate attacks?

  • Phishing emails – With inboxes flooded daily, it can be hard to spot potential threats in emails. Hackers send targeted emails that may address a work-related matter from a co-worker or manager. One click on the wrong email, and you could be infecting your business device with malware. It is important every employee understand what suspicious emails “look” like and how to avoid nefarious click bait.
  • Using company devices for personal work – It’s an easy thing to do – grab a work device off the counter and start online shopping, emailing friends and family, or finally getting around to baking that chocolate chip cookie recipe from Martha Stewart. However, accessing un-secured sites and opening personal, and potentially phishing, emails on a work computer puts companies at risk. As an HR manager, you must recognize this common occurrence and be able to speak to it with your staff. If a hacker is able to gain access to a business computer through an employee’s personal use, they gain access to all of the company information on that employee’s device as well.
  • Using personal devices to conduct business – The same can be said for using personal devices to conduct business. It can be difficult to “turn off” after work hours and many employees answer some work emails on their cell phone, or load a work document on his/her personal tablet or laptop. When company staff access potentially sensitive business documents on their personal device, they risk leaking that information to a hacker. To prevent attacks company-wide, HR pros must be aware of how often this type of behavior occurs and work closely with their IT department to learn how company networks are secured when remote access is granted to employees outside of home and work IP addresses.

HR managers: Spread good cyber hygiene!

Security awareness training is becoming increasingly prevalent at companies that know what it takes to have good cyber hygiene. According to a recent report by Infosec, about 53% of U.S companies have some form of security awareness training in place. While this is still barely over half, it’s a start. So what can you do to rank among companies leading the charge in cyber security?

  • Offer continuous training – Cyber security awareness training is not a “one and done” event. This kind of training should continue throughout the year, at all levels of an organization, and be specific to different job roles within the company. Technology is always changing, which means the threatscape is too. When you are battling a constantly shifting enemy, your employees need to be vigilantly trained to understand each shift.
  • Perform “live fire” training exercisesLive fire exercises (LFX) happen when users undergo a simulated cyber attack specific to their job or industry. One example is having your IT department send out a phishing email. See how many people click on it and show them how easily they could have been hacked. This data can be used to show progress, tailor problem areas, and train to specific threats as needed.
  • Stress the importance of security at work and at home – Showing employees the benefit of cyber awareness in the workplace translates to awareness at home as well. Help prospective and existing employees gain a wide breadth of understanding about cyber best practices by making learning approachable instead of unattainable or intimidating.
  • Reward good cyber hygiene – Reward employees who find malicious emails or other threats with your company’s IT team and share success stories of how employees helped thwart security issues with vigilant “eyes” on suspicious activity. Equally, it is important to also empathize with employees who make mistakes and give them the tools to learn from their mistakes. Many employees receive hundreds of emails each day, and while training tips and education are helpful tools, it is not a perfect solution.

Training employees to be cyber aware can be difficult unless a structured program and management strategy is in place. We’re here to help! Circadence’s security awareness platform, inCyt, is coming soon! inCyt allows employees to compete in cyber-themed battles and empowers them to understand professional and personal cyber responsibility. By cultivating safe cyber practices in virtual environments, HR managers can increase security awareness and reduce risks to the business.

To learn more and stay in the know for upcoming product launches, visit www.circadence.com

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Living our Mission: Project Ares Takes Full Flight with Cloud-Native Architecture

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According to CIO magazine, about 96% of organizations use cloud services in one way or another. In partnership with Microsoft, we are proud to announce that Circadence has redesigned its Project Ares cyber learning platform to fully leverage a cloud-native design on Microsoft Azure.  This new, flexible architecture improves cyber training to be even more customized, scalable, accessible, and relevant for today’s professionals.

This transition to cloud infrastructure will yield immediate impacts to our current customers.

  • Increased speeds to launch cyber learning battle rooms and missions
  • Greater ability to onboard more trainees to the system from virtually any location
  • More access to cyber training content that suits their security needs and professional development interests

Proven success at Microsoft Ignite

At the recent Microsoft Ignite conference (November 2019), more than 500 security professionals had the opportunity to use the enhanced platform.  Conference participants set up CyberBridge accounts and then played customized battle rooms in Project Ares. Microsoft cloud-based Azure security solutions were integrated into the cloud-based cyber range to provide an immersive “cloud-in-cloud” sandboxed learning experience that realistically aligned to phases of a ransomware attack.  The new version of Project Ares sustained weeklong intensive usage while delivering on performance. 

So what’s new in the new and improved Project Ares?

Curriculum Access Controls for Tailored Cyber Learning

One of the biggest enhancements for Project Ares clients is that they can now control permissions for  training exercises and solution access at the user level. Customer Administrators will use the new CyberBridge management portal to tailor access to Circadence training exercises for individual users or groups of users.

Single-sign-on through CyberBridge enables the alignment of training exercises to individuals based on their unique learning requirements including:

  • Cyber skill-building exercises and complex missions within Project Ares for cyber professionals
  • Cyber foundation learning with Cyber Essentials tools for the IT team
  • Security awareness training with inCyt for general staff

Cyber Essential learning tools and the inCyt game for security awareness will be added to CyberBridge over the next several months. With the capability to pre-select training activities reflective of a company’s overall security strategy, enterprise security managers can call the shots.

“As the administrator, you now choose what curriculum content your team should have. “This provides more flexibility in cyber training for our customers in terms of what they can expose to their teams.” ~ Rajani Kutty, Senior Product Manager for CyberBridge at Circadence.

Greater Scalability and Performance in Cyber Training

With a cloud-native architecture design, Project Ares can support more simultaneous users on the platform than ever before. Project Ares can now handle over 1,000 concurrent users, a significant improvement over historical capacity of 200-250 concurrent users on the platform.  The combination of  content access control at the group or individual level and the increased scalability of Project Ares creates a solution that effectively spins up cyber ranges with built-in learning exercises for teams and enterprises of any size.  Additionally, this means that no matter where a cyber learner is geographically, they can log on to Project Ares and access training quickly. We see this as similar to the scalability and accessibility of any large global content provider (e.g. Netflix)—in that users who have accounts can log in virtually anywhere in the world at multiple times and access their accounts.

Now that Project Ares can support a greater volume of users on the platform, activities like hosting cyber competitions and events for experts and aspiring security professionals can be done on-demand and at scale.

“We can train more people in cyber than ever before and that is so impactful when we remember the industry’s challenges in workforce gaps and skills deficiencies.” ~ Paul Ellis, Project Ares Senior Product Manager at Circadence

The previous design of Project Ares required placing users in “enclaves” or groups when they signed on to the system to ensure the content within could be loaded quickly without delay. Now, everyone can sign in at any time and have access to learning without loading delays. It doesn’t even matter if multiple people are accessing the same mission or battle room at the same time. Their individual experience loading and playing the exercise won’t be compromised because of increased user activity.

Other performance improvements made to this version of Project Ares include:

  • Quicker download speeds of cyber exercises
  • Use of less memory on user’s computers, and resulting longer battery life for users, thanks to lower CPU utilization.
  • These behind-the-scenes improvements mean that training can happen quicker and learning, faster.

New Cyber Training Content

One new Mission and three new Battle Rooms will be deployed throughout the next few months on this new version of Project Ares.

  • Mission 15, Operation Raging Mammoth, showcases how to protect against an Election attack
  • Battle Rooms 19 and 20 feature Splunk Enterprise installation, configuration, and fundamentals
  • Battle Room 21 teaches Powershell cmdlet (pronounced command-lets) basics

Mission 15 has been developed from many discussions about 2020 election security given past reports of Russian hacktivist groups interfering with the 2016 U.S. election.  In Operation Raging Mammoth, users are tasked to monitor voting-related systems. In order to identify anomalies, players must first establish a baseline of normal activity and configurations. Any changes to administrator access or attempt to modify voter registration information must be quickly detected and reported to authorities. Like all Project Ares Missions, the exercise aligns with NIST/NICE work roles, specifically Cyber Defense Analyst, Cyber Defense Incident Responder, Threat/Warning analyst.

Battle Rooms 19 and 20 focuses on using Splunk software to assist IT and security teams to get the most out of their security tools by enabling log aggregation of event data from across an environment into a single repository of critical security insights. Teaching cyber pros how to configure and use this tool helps them identify issues faster so they can resolve them more efficiently to stop threats and attacks.

Battle Room 21 teaches cmdlet lightweight commands used in PowerShell.  PowerShell is a command-line (CLI) scripting language developed by Microsoft to simplify automation and configuration management, consisting of a command-line shell and associated scripting language. With PowerShell, network analysts can obtain all the information they need to solve problems they detect in an environment. Microsoft notes that PowerShell also makes learning other programming languages like C# easier.

Embracing Cloud Capabilities for Continual Cyber Training

Circadence embraces all the capabilities the cloud provides and is pleased to launch the latest version of Project Ares that furthers our vision to provide sustainable, scalable, adaptable cyber training and learning opportunities to professionals so they can combat evolving threats in their workplace and in their personal lives.

As this upward trend in cloud utilization becomes ever-more prevalent, security teams of all sizes need to adapt their strategies to acknowledge the adoption of the cloud and train persistently in Project Ares. You can bet that as more people convene in the cloud, malicious hackers are not far behind them, looking for ways to exploit it. By continually innovating in Project Ares, we hope professionals all over the globe can better manage their networks in the cloud and protect them from attackers.

Rethinking cyber learning—consider gamification

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This post originally appeared on Microsoft’s Security Blog, authored by Mark McIntyre, Executive Security Advisor, Enterprise Cybersecurity Group

Living our Mission Blog Series: How Tony Hammerling, Curriculum Developer, Orchestrates a Symphony of Cyber Learning at Circadence

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Circadence’s Curriculum Developer Tony Hammerling wasn’t always interested in a career in cyber—but he was certainly made for it. In fact, he initially wanted to be a musician! While his musical talents didn’t pan out for him early in his career, he quickly learned how to create unique harmonies using computers instead of instruments…After joining the Navy in 1995 as a Cryptologist and Morse Code operator, he transitioned to a Cryptologic Technician Networks professional where he performed network analysis and social network/persona analysis. It was there he learned more offensive and defensive strategies pertinent to cyber security and was introduced to network types and communication patterns. He moved to Maryland to do offensive analysis and then retired in Pensacola, Florida. The world of cyber grew on Tony and he enjoyed the digital accompaniment of the work it offered.

For the last few years, now settled in Pensacola, Florida, Tony is a critical part of Circadence’s Curriculum Team, working alongside colleagues to develop learning objectives and routes for players using platforms like inCyt, Project Ares, and other cyber games like NexAgent, Circadence’s immersive network exploration game. Currently, Tony and his team are focused on building out learning of network essentials in NexAgent, and “…are bridging the gap between what new IT professional’s learn in NexAgent and getting them onto more advanced learning pathways in Project Ares,” says Tony.

“We’re starting to introduce new content for [Project Ares] battle rooms so users coming out of NexAgent can have an understanding of the tools and techniques needed for more advanced learning of cyber defense—and actually apply those tools and techniques in realistic scenarios.”

As the technical subject matter expert for cyber curriculum, Tony digs into the details with his work—and that’s where he shines. Tony and his team ensure that user learning is reflective of today’s cyber attacks and vulnerabilities. In the next iteration of NexAgent, users will be able to focus on network segmentation using election security as the theme for game-play. From separating election polling servers to working with registration databases to designing networks to prevent election fraud, learning becomes much more interesting for the end-user.

The most exciting part about Tony’s job is the diversity of material he gets to work on every day. One day he could be helping end-users of Project Ares identify fraudulent IP addresses in a battle room and another day he could be working on a full-scale technical design of a SCADA system modeled after a cyber incident at a Ukrainian power plant.

By understanding corporate demands for new content, Tony and his team have more direction to build out cyber learning curriculum that aligns to customer’s needs. He believes the technical training he’s able to support with learning material in Circadence’s platforms complements traditional cyber learning paths like obtaining certifications and attending off-site classes. The variety of learning options for users of all cyber ability levels (both technical and non-technical), gives professionals the opportunity to be more thoughtful in their day-to-day lives, more critical and discerning of vulnerabilities and systems, and more creative in how they address threats.

“Knowing that people are able to come into a Circadence product and learn something that they didn’t know before or refine specific knowledge into an application/skill-based path is exciting. I don’t think too much of the greater impact my work provides—but perhaps 10 years down the line when we can say ‘we were the first to gamify and scale cyber training,’ it will mean so much more.”

We are grateful for the unique talents Tony brings to the Circadence family of products and how he’s able to craft learning “chords” that when orchestrated, provide a symphonic concerto of cyber learning activity—empowering cyber professionals across the globe with relevant, persistent, and scalable cyber training options to suit their security needs.

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8 Tips to Keep Your Small Business Cyber Safe this Holiday Season

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The holiday season is a time of giving, however, for hackers it can be a time of swindling. We are all susceptible to cyberattacks, but small businesses can hurt the most from the fall out. With limited staff numbers, small IT departments (if any at all), and no money allocated toward remediation, it is of the utmost importance to protect your small business, especially over the holidays. So, what can you do to protect yourself?

  1. Understand your vulnerability by industry – While every industry can be targeted by scammers, there are some more at risk than others. Specifically, retail, automotive, manufacturing, and financial. Not only do these industries process a lot of sensitive data and large quantities of money, but they also use automated process and many interconnected devices which are vulnerable to cyber attacks. Assessing your risk is the first step in preventing it.
  2. Adopt a cyber security policy – Whether you’re a sole proprietor or a company with 5,000 employees, cyber criminals are targeting your business. Smaller businesses may not have controls, processes, or policies in place for cyber security defense and offense. There are several options for securing a comprehensive cyber security plan such as a managed service provider (MSP), a systems integrator or security system provider, or a cyber security consultant. Take the time to put together a comprehensive policy for your employees to learn and reference.
  3. Educate employees on cyber risks and prevention – It won’t do you any good to adopt a cyber policy if you don’t train your employees on risk awareness and staying safe online while working. Ensure you utilize persistent, hands-on learning, such as a cyber range, to keep employees abreast of the latest threats while building confidence in their abilities to recognize threats and suspicious activity.
  4. Beware of popular scam tactics used against small businesses – From overpayment scams to phishing emails, hackers will try just about anything to get to your money and sensitive information. Be wary of anything that looks or sounds suspicious such as calls from unknown persons, pop-ups, and unfamiliar websites, only open emails from trusted sources, and NEVER give your credit card or personal information to anyone you don’t know whether over the phone, by email, or in person.
  5. Secure WiFi Networks – These days all businesses require WiFi to operate, so you need to ensure your network is safe. Hide your network, which you can do by googling instructions or working with your internet provider, so that your router does not broadcast the network name (or SSID) and ensure that a password is required for access. Be sure you change the administrative password that was on the device when first purchased as well to a complex password only you will remember. Setting up a private network for employees and offering a guest network to customers is a great way to keep customers happy while ensuring your cyber safety.
  6. Make backup copies of important information – Regularly back up data on every computer used in your business including documents, spreadsheets, financial and personnel files, and more. You can do this through many channels from uploading files to an external hardrive, USB, the cloud, or using a paid data storage site.
  7. Install and update antivirus software – Every device you use for your business needs to be protected with antivirus, antispyware, and antimalware software. You will need to purchase this software either online or from a retail store and will need to assess your specific needs based on a variety of factors, such as the type of operating system you use (mac or PC) and your budget. Here is a handy guide for things to consider before purchasing antivirus software. Be sure you install and update antivirus software regularly to ensure the newest and best iteration is at work protecting your sensitive information.
  8. Install a VPN – A virtual private network (VPN) is a software that enables a mobile device to connect to another secure network via the internet and send and receive data safely. If you regularly use your smartphone to access secure information for your small business, it can be technology that is well worth investing in. Setting up a VPN is a simple task but depends on what operating system you use. Check out this great article that guides you through VPN set up for various systems.

By following these tips and tricks, you can ensure that your business stays protected and profitable. Cyber security is an ever-changing field, and businesses must continually adapt to new attack methods and be able to defend themselves. Keep the latest in cyber training at your fingertips with Circadence’s inCyt security awareness game of strategy and if you have a small security team/IT professional, consider our flagship immersive, gamified cyber learning platform, Project Ares for advanced cyber training. We wish you a safe and happy holiday season!

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Operation Gratitude: 5 Reasons to Give Thanks for Cyber Security

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With daily breaches impacting business operations and security, it’s easy to forget about the good ways that cyber security keeps us safe behind the scenes. This holiday season, we’re giving thanks to cyber security and all that it does to make our lives easier and more secure with what we’re calling Operation Gratitude (inspired by our Project Ares missions, uniquely titled “Operation Goatherd” or “Operation Desert Whale”). #OperationGratitude is a rally cry for security professionals and business leaders to remember the positive aspects of cyber security and share those positive thoughts with each other. Too often we live in fear from cyber attacks and persistent threats, and while, there is always cause for concern, we must remember how advances in the field have equally made aspects of our digital life easier. We’re thankful for these advances in cyber security:

  1. Two-factor authentication – This tool helps to keep you secure by requiring two different credentials before allowing you to gain access to sensitive information online. One example of this would be when you log in to check your bank statements and it prompts you to not only enter your username and password, but also to check your phone and enter a verification code that was texted to you. You will normally see this security precaution used when logging into an account from a new device. The great part about it is, it’s widely known and used by everyone from CISOs to high school kids.
  2. HTTP(S) – You’ve likely seen this appear when visiting a URL online, usually showing up just before the “www” and website name. Http means HyperText Transfer Protocol. HTTP is the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web, which defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands. The “S” is for security, and this little letter means that all communication between your browser and your website is encrypted for your protection. This means that sites utilizing https are prioritizing your safety while performing sensitive transactions online!
  3. Personal digital responsibility – These days the average consumer is more connected than ever. With our lives relying on smartphones, computers, tablets, and a multitude of IoT devices, we are entrenched in cyber every single day. This reliance requires us to practice personal digital responsibility, or often called digital citizenship—that is, the ability to participate safely, intelligently, productively, and responsibly in the digital world. Just because we are more connected does not necessarily mean that we are more aware of cyber risks, however, initiatives such as Cyber Security Awareness Month (in October) are helping to increase awareness by promoting cyber citizenship and education. Circadence is proud to contribute to the security awareness and digital responsibility effort with the soon-to-be-available inCyt, a security awareness game of strategy that helps bring cyber safe practices into the workplace and cultivates good cyber hygiene for all (and you don’t have to be a technical expert to use it).
  4. Corporate security awareness trainings – Given that 25% of all data breaches in the U.S in 2018 were due to carelessness or user error, it is critical for companies of all sizes to engage their employees in persistent cyber training. Thank goodness there is an increase in organizations such as the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) that provide risk assessments and security training to organizations across the U.S.
  5. Increased security collaboration – With more than 4,000 ransomware attacks alone occurring daily, no one business can mitigate the increasing amount of cyber risks present in today’s threatscape. It is more important than ever for businesses to share knowledge from breaches they have experienced and stand together to fight cyber crime, which is exactly what they’re doing! Nowadays these partnerships are being formed not only to share information, but to conduct live fire cyber readiness exercises. One such initiative is DHS’s National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center(NCCIC) – a 24/7 cyber situational awareness, management and response center serving as a national nexus of cyber and communications integration for the federal government, intelligence community, and law enforcement. The NCCIC also shares information among public and private sector partners to build awareness of vulnerabilities, incidents, and mitigations.

So, as you prepare your Thanksgiving meal from recipes pulled up on your tablet, with holiday music playing from your smart phone, and timers set by Alexa to ensure the juiciest turkey and tastiest pies, remember to give thanks for cyber security. We certainly are!

 

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Living our Mission Blog Series: Supporting Cyber Red Teams, with Consultations and Pen Testing from Josiah Bryan

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While Circadence is proud to be a pioneer that has developed innovative cyber learning products to strengthen readiness at all levels of business, there’s one professional area at Circadence that doesn’t tend to get the limelight, until now. Meet Josiah Bryan, principle Security Architect for Circadence’s security consultation services, aptly called Advanced Red Team Intrusion Capabilities (ARTIC for short). For almost two years, Josiah has provided support and services to Red Teams around the country, those leading-edge professionals who test and challenge the security readiness of a system by assuming adversarial roles and hacker points of view.

Josiah enjoys doing penetration testing and exploit development with Red Teams at a variety of companies to help them understand what a bad actor might try to do to compromise their security systems.

But Josiah wasn’t always on the offensive side of cyber security in his professional career. He was first introduced to the “blue team,” or the defensive side of cyber, when he began participating in Capture the Flag competitions across the U.S. during his time as a computer science student at Charleston Southern University. Those competitions also exposed him to the offensive side of security training and he never looked back.

After graduation, he took a job in San Diego with the U.S. Navy as a DoD civilian, finding vulnerabilities in critical infrastructure, which were then reported up to the Department of Homeland Security.

“Learning how the DoD operates internally and how they conduct penetration tests/security evaluations was an extremely valuable skill and great background for my current job at Circadence,” he says.

In addition to consulting with Red Teams, Josiah uses a variety of tools to show and tell companies about existing vulnerabilities. For example, badge scanners that let people gain access to a facility or room are quite common devices for Josiah and his team to test for customers. He might also use USB implants that provide full access to workstations and wireless signal identification devices.

“We show people how easy it is to get credentials off of someone’s badge and gain access to an area,” he says. “They never believe we will find vulnerabilities but when we do, they realize how much they need to do to improve their cyber readiness,” he adds.

But, ultimately Josiah’s favorite part of his job is the level of research and analysis he gets to do. “We are a research team, first,” he says. “We are pushing the boundaries in cybersecurity and discovering new ways that bad actors might take advantage of companies, before they actually do.  It’s a great feeling to help companies and Red Teams see the ‘light’ before the hackers get them,” he adds.

Whether circumventing a security measure or patching a system, Josiah’s contributions to the field are significant.

“Finding new ways to help people understand the importance of strong cyber hygiene is fulfilling,” he says. “We can’t stress it enough in today’s culture where attacks are so dynamic and hackers are always looking for ways to take advantage of companies.”

To stay on the cutting edge of Red Team support, Josiah follows Circadence’s philosophy to persistently learn new ways to protect people and companies. “Any company is only as good as the least trained person,” Josiah says.

 

Why Alternatives to Traditional Cyber Training Are Needed Immediately

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Are you looking for a more effective, cost-conscious cyber training tool that actually teaches competencies and cyber skills? We’ve been there. Let us share our perspective on the top cyber training alternatives to complement or supplement your organization’s current training efforts.

Cyber training has evolved over the years but not at pace with the rapid persistence of cybercrime. Cyberattacks impact businesses of all sizes and it’s only a matter of time before your business is next in line. Traditional cyber training has been comprised of individuals sitting in a classroom environment, off-site, reading static materials, listening to lectures, and if you’re lucky, performing step-by-step, prescriptive tasks to “upskill” and “learn.” Unfortunately, this model isn’t working anymore. Learners are not retaining concepts and are disengaged from the learning process. This means by the time they make it back to your company to defend your networks, they’ve likely forgotten most of the new concepts that you sent them to learn about in the first place. Read more on the disadvantages of passive cyber training here.

So, what cyber training alternatives are available for building competency and skill among professionals? More importantly, why do you need a better way to train professionals? We hope this blog helps answer these questions.

Cyber Range Training

Cyber ranges provide trainees with simulated (highly scalable, small number of servers) or emulated (high fidelity testing using real computers, OS, and application) environments to practice skills such as defending networks, hardening critical infrastructure (ICS/SCADA) and responding to attacks. They simulate realistic technical settings for professionals to practice network configurations and detect abnormalities and anomalies in computer systems. While simulated ranges are considered more affordable than emulated ranges, several academic papers question whether test results from a simulation reflect a cyber pro’s workplace reality.

Traditional Cyber Security Training

Courses can be taken in a classroom setting from certified instructors (like a SANS course), self-paced over the Internet, or in mentored settings in cities around the world. Several organizations offer online classes too, for professionals looking to hone their skills in their specific work role (e.g. incident response analyst, ethical hacker). Online or in-classroom training environments are almost exclusively built to cater to offensive-type cyber security practices and are highly prescriptive when it comes to the learning and the process for submitting “answers”/ scoring.

However, as cyber security proves to be largely a “learn by doing” skillset, where outside-of-the-box thinking, real-world, high fidelity virtual environments, and on-going training are crucially important, attendees of traditional course trainings are often left searching for more cross-disciplined opportunities to hone their craft over the long term. Nevertheless, online trainings prove a good first step for professionals who want foundational learnings from which they can build upon with more sophisticated tools and technologies.

Gamified, Cyber Range, Cloud-Based Training

It wouldn’t be our blog if we didn’t mention Project Ares as a recommended, next generation alternative to traditional cyber training for professionals because it uses gamified backstories to engage learners in activities.  And, it combines the benefits and convenience of online, cyber range training with the power of AI and machine learning to automate and augment trainee’s cyber competencies.

Our goal is to create a learning experience that is engaging, immersive, fun, and challenges trainee thinking in ways most authentic to cyber scenarios they’d experience in their actual jobs.

Project Ares was built with an active-learning approach to teaching, which studies show increase information retention among learners to 75% compared to passive-learning models.

Check out the comparison table below for details on the differences between traditional training models and what Project Ares delivers.

Traditional Training
(classroom and online delivery of lectured based material)
Project Ares
(immersive environment for hands on, experiential learning)
Curriculum Design

  • Instructors are generally experts in their field and exceptional classroom facilitators.
  • Often hired to develop a specific course.
  • It can take up to a year to build a course and it might be used for as long as 5 years, with updates.
  • Instructors are challenged to keep pace with evolving threats and to update course material frequently enough to reflect today’s attack surface in real time.
  • It is taught the same way every time.
Curriculum Design

  • Cyber subject matter experts partner with instructional design specialists to reengineer real-world threat scenarios into immersive, learning-based exercises.
  • An in-game advisor serves as a resource for players to guide them through activities, minimizing the need for physical instructors and subsequent overhead.
  • Project Ares is drawn from real-world threats and attacks, so content is always relevant and updated to meet user’s needs.
Learning Delivery

  • Courses are often concept-specific going deep on a narrow subject. And it can take multiple courses to cover a whole subject area.
  • Students take the whole course or watch the whole video – for example, if a student knows 70%, they sit through that to get to the 30% that is new to them.
  • On Demand materials are available for reference (sometimes for an additional fee) and are helpful for review of complex concepts.   But this does not help student put the concepts into practice.
  • Most courses teach offensive concepts….from the viewpoint that it is easier to teach how to break the network and then assumes that students will figure out how to ‘re-engineer’ defense. This approach can build a deep foundational understanding of concepts but it is not tempered by practical ‘application’ until students are back home facing real defensive challenges.
Learning  Delivery

  • Wherever a user is in his/her cyber security career path, Project Ares meets them at their level and provides a curriculum pathway.
  • From skills to strategy:   Students / Players can use the Project Ares platform to refresh skills, learn new skills, test their capabilities on their own and, most critically, collaborate with teammates to combine techniques and critical thinking to successfully reach the end of a mission.
  • It takes a village to defend a network, sensitive data, executive leaders, finances, and an enterprises reputation:  This approach teaches and enables experience of the many and multiple skills and job roles that come together in the real-world to detect and respond to threats and attacks….
  • Project Ares creates challenging environments that demand the kind of problem solving and strategic thinking necessary to create an effective and evolving defensive posture
  • Project Ares Battle Rooms and Missions present real-world problems that need to be solved, not just answered. It is a higher-level learning approach.

If you want to learn more about Project Ares and how it stacks up to other training options out there, watch our on-demand webinar “Get Gamified: Why Cyber Learning Happens Better With Games” featuring our VP of Global Partnerships, Keenan Skelly.

  You can also contact our experts at info@circadence.com or schedule a demo to see it in action!

Photo by Helloquence on Unsplash

Help Wanted: Combating the Cyber Skills Gap

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Recent news headlines frequently communicate about the massive cyber security skills shortage in the industry so we wanted to dig deeper into this phenomenon to find out why there’s a cyber security talent gap and what can be done about it. Cyberattacks are permeating every commercial and government sector out there yet industry and analyst reports indicate there isn’t a large enough talent pool of defenders to keep pace with evolving threats. When data is compromised and there aren’t enough cyber security staff to secure the front lines, we ALL are at risk of identity theft, monetary losses, reputational damage, fines, and operational disruption. cy

Statistics on the Cyber Skills and Talent Gap

With more than one in four organizations experiencing an advanced persistent threat (APT) attack and when 97 percent of those APT’s are considered a credible threat to national security and economic stability, it’s no wonder the skills shortage is on everyone’s mind.

A report from Frost & Sullivan found that the global cybersecurity workforce will have more than 1.8 million unfilled positions by 2020 (that’s next year!) while some sources report a 3.5 million shortfall by 2021.

It begs several questions:

  • What’s causing the shortage of cybersecurity skills? According to a Deloitte report, the lack of effective training opportunities and risk of attrition may be to blame.
  • Is there really a shortage of talent? Hacker, security evangelist, and cyber security professional Alyssa Miller thinks there is more of a cyber talent disconnect between job seeker’s expectations of what a job entails versus what employer’s demand from a prospective candidate.
  • How do we fill these cyber positions? A study of 2,000 American adults found that nearly 80% of adults never considered cyber security careers. Why? Sheer unawareness. Most had never even heard of specific cyber job roles like a penetration tester and software engineer and others were deterred by their lack of education, interest, and knowledge about how to launch a cyber career.

Strategies to Minimize the Cybersecurity Skills Shortage

Given the pervasive nature of cyber attacks, businesses can’t afford to wait around for premiere talent to walk through the door. Companies need to take a proactive and non-traditional approach to hiring talent—and, yes, it takes effort. Closing the corporate cyber-operations talent shortage may even take a company culture overhaul.

Miller suggests that recruiters “must learn to engage security professionals through less traditional avenues. The best security recruiters have learned how to connect with the community via social media. They’ve learned how to have meaningful interactions on Twitter and are patient in their approach.”

Whether looking to fill a position in digital forensics or computer programming or network defense or even cyber law, the skills required for those positions can be taught with the right tools. Companies should learn to be flexible with those requirements as many are now filling unopened positions by hiring and then teaching and training professionals on preferred cyber skills and competencies. Recruiters need to adopt a paradigm shift during the talent search and be more comfortable hiring for character and cultural fit first, then, training for skills development.

Fill the talent pipeline

Consider hiring people with different industry backgrounds or skill sets to bring new ideas to the table. Sometimes, getting an “outside” perspective on the challenges firms are facing sheds a new light because they notice nuances and inconsistencies that internal teams, who are in the day-to-day, may not see immediately. Look for passionate candidates with an eagerness to learn.

Companies today are prioritizing skills, knowledge, and willingness to learn over degrees and career fields because they know that some things cannot be taught in a classroom such as: curiosity, passion, problem-solving, and strong ethics.

Look for individuals with real-world experience

If you happen to have candidates in your pipeline that have industry knowledge, ask about their real-world experience. Inquire about the kinds of things they’ve learned in their previous position and get them to share how they remedied attacks. Create a checklist of skills you desire from a candidate that may include identity management, incident response management, system administration, network design and security, and hacking methodologies, to name a few. Learning how they dealt with real situations will reveal a lot about their personality, character, and skill set.

Re-examine job postings

Often a job posting is the only thing compelling a candidate to apply for a position. If the job posting is simply a laundry list of skills requirements and degree preferences, it may deter candidates who have those skills but also seek to work for a company that values innovation, creativity, and strategic vision. Read descriptions carefully to determine if they portray the culture of your organization. If a cultural vibe is lacking, it may be time to inject a sense of corporate personality to attract the right candidates.

Provide continuous professional development opportunities

With advances in technology, professionals need to be on top of the latest trends and tools to succeed in their job. That is why it is vital to re-skill and persistently train cybersecurity professionals so they can prepare for anything that comes their way—and you can retain your top talent. Conferences, webinars and certifications are not for everyone—so it is important to find growth opportunities that employees want to pursue for both their personal as well as their professional benefit.

Create a culture of empowerment for retention

CISOs can set expectations early in the hiring process so candidates understand how their specific role impacts the organization. For example, during the interview process, notify candidates of your expectation that they be “students of the industry” such that they are expected to stay on top of security news and happenings.

Gartner advocates for a “people-centric security” approach where stacks of tools are secondary to the powerful human element of security. Additionally, send out quarterly or bi-monthly roundups of the latest cyber security news and events to keep your team abreast of current affairs. Making it as easy as possible for them to be “students of the industry” increases the likelihood that they will remain current on industry developments and engaged in their role.

Invest in Cyber Training to Cultivate Talent

Executives are demonstrating their support for strong info security programs by increasing hiring budgets, supporting the development of info security operation centers (SOCs) and providing CISOs with the resources they need to build strong teams.

With the right talent, you will have a better chance of successfully defeating attackers, staying aware of current threats, and protecting your team, your company—and your job. These strategies will go a long way in preventing future attacks and preparing staff and systems to respond when things go awry. The cyber security staffing shortage is no longer just a cyber security department issue—it’s a global business risk issue.