Living our Mission Blog Series: How Tony Hammerling, Curriculum Developer, Orchestrates a Symphony of Cyber Learning at Circadence

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Circadence’s Curriculum Developer Tony Hammerling wasn’t always interested in a career in cyber—but he was certainly made for it. In fact, he initially wanted to be a musician! While his musical talents didn’t pan out for him early in his career, he quickly learned how to create unique harmonies using computers instead of instruments…After joining the Navy in 1995 as a Cryptologist and Morse Code operator, he transitioned to a Cryptologic Technician Networks professional where he performed network analysis and social network/persona analysis. It was there he learned more offensive and defensive strategies pertinent to cyber security and was introduced to network types and communication patterns. He moved to Maryland to do offensive analysis and then retired in Pensacola, Florida. The world of cyber grew on Tony and he enjoyed the digital accompaniment of the work it offered.

For the last few years, now settled in Pensacola, Florida, Tony is a critical part of Circadence’s Curriculum Team, working alongside colleagues to develop learning objectives and routes for players using platforms like inCyt, Project Ares, and other cyber games like NexAgent, Circadence’s immersive network exploration game. Currently, Tony and his team are focused on building out learning of network essentials in NexAgent, and “…are bridging the gap between what new IT professional’s learn in NexAgent and getting them onto more advanced learning pathways in Project Ares,” says Tony.

“We’re starting to introduce new content for [Project Ares] battle rooms so users coming out of NexAgent can have an understanding of the tools and techniques needed for more advanced learning of cyber defense—and actually apply those tools and techniques in realistic scenarios.”

As the technical subject matter expert for cyber curriculum, Tony digs into the details with his work—and that’s where he shines. Tony and his team ensure that user learning is reflective of today’s cyber attacks and vulnerabilities. In the next iteration of NexAgent, users will be able to focus on network segmentation using election security as the theme for game-play. From separating election polling servers to working with registration databases to designing networks to prevent election fraud, learning becomes much more interesting for the end-user.

The most exciting part about Tony’s job is the diversity of material he gets to work on every day. One day he could be helping end-users of Project Ares identify fraudulent IP addresses in a battle room and another day he could be working on a full-scale technical design of a SCADA system modeled after a cyber incident at a Ukrainian power plant.

By understanding corporate demands for new content, Tony and his team have more direction to build out cyber learning curriculum that aligns to customer’s needs. He believes the technical training he’s able to support with learning material in Circadence’s platforms complements traditional cyber learning paths like obtaining certifications and attending off-site classes. The variety of learning options for users of all cyber ability levels (both technical and non-technical), gives professionals the opportunity to be more thoughtful in their day-to-day lives, more critical and discerning of vulnerabilities and systems, and more creative in how they address threats.

“Knowing that people are able to come into a Circadence product and learn something that they didn’t know before or refine specific knowledge into an application/skill-based path is exciting. I don’t think too much of the greater impact my work provides—but perhaps 10 years down the line when we can say ‘we were the first to gamify and scale cyber training,’ it will mean so much more.”

We are grateful for the unique talents Tony brings to the Circadence family of products and how he’s able to craft learning “chords” that when orchestrated, provide a symphonic concerto of cyber learning activity—empowering cyber professionals across the globe with relevant, persistent, and scalable cyber training options to suit their security needs.

Photo by Marius Masalar on Unsplash

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8 Tips to Keep Your Small Business Cyber Safe this Holiday Season

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The holiday season is a time of giving, however, for hackers it can be a time of swindling. We are all susceptible to cyberattacks, but small businesses can hurt the most from the fall out. With limited staff numbers, small IT departments (if any at all), and no money allocated toward remediation, it is of the utmost importance to protect your small business, especially over the holidays. So, what can you do to protect yourself?

  1. Understand your vulnerability by industry – While every industry can be targeted by scammers, there are some more at risk than others. Specifically, retail, automotive, manufacturing, and financial. Not only do these industries process a lot of sensitive data and large quantities of money, but they also use automated process and many interconnected devices which are vulnerable to cyber attacks. Assessing your risk is the first step in preventing it.
  2. Adopt a cyber security policy – Whether you’re a sole proprietor or a company with 5,000 employees, cyber criminals are targeting your business. Smaller businesses may not have controls, processes, or policies in place for cyber security defense and offense. There are several options for securing a comprehensive cyber security plan such as a managed service provider (MSP), a systems integrator or security system provider, or a cyber security consultant. Take the time to put together a comprehensive policy for your employees to learn and reference.
  3. Educate employees on cyber risks and prevention – It won’t do you any good to adopt a cyber policy if you don’t train your employees on risk awareness and staying safe online while working. Ensure you utilize persistent, hands-on learning, such as a cyber range, to keep employees abreast of the latest threats while building confidence in their abilities to recognize threats and suspicious activity.
  4. Beware of popular scam tactics used against small businesses – From overpayment scams to phishing emails, hackers will try just about anything to get to your money and sensitive information. Be wary of anything that looks or sounds suspicious such as calls from unknown persons, pop-ups, and unfamiliar websites, only open emails from trusted sources, and NEVER give your credit card or personal information to anyone you don’t know whether over the phone, by email, or in person.
  5. Secure WiFi Networks – These days all businesses require WiFi to operate, so you need to ensure your network is safe. Hide your network, which you can do by googling instructions or working with your internet provider, so that your router does not broadcast the network name (or SSID) and ensure that a password is required for access. Be sure you change the administrative password that was on the device when first purchased as well to a complex password only you will remember. Setting up a private network for employees and offering a guest network to customers is a great way to keep customers happy while ensuring your cyber safety.
  6. Make backup copies of important information – Regularly back up data on every computer used in your business including documents, spreadsheets, financial and personnel files, and more. You can do this through many channels from uploading files to an external hardrive, USB, the cloud, or using a paid data storage site.
  7. Install and update antivirus software – Every device you use for your business needs to be protected with antivirus, antispyware, and antimalware software. You will need to purchase this software either online or from a retail store and will need to assess your specific needs based on a variety of factors, such as the type of operating system you use (mac or PC) and your budget. Here is a handy guide for things to consider before purchasing antivirus software. Be sure you install and update antivirus software regularly to ensure the newest and best iteration is at work protecting your sensitive information.
  8. Install a VPN – A virtual private network (VPN) is a software that enables a mobile device to connect to another secure network via the internet and send and receive data safely. If you regularly use your smartphone to access secure information for your small business, it can be technology that is well worth investing in. Setting up a VPN is a simple task but depends on what operating system you use. Check out this great article that guides you through VPN set up for various systems.

By following these tips and tricks, you can ensure that your business stays protected and profitable. Cyber security is an ever-changing field, and businesses must continually adapt to new attack methods and be able to defend themselves. Keep the latest in cyber training at your fingertips with Circadence’s inCyt security awareness game of strategy and if you have a small security team/IT professional, consider our flagship immersive, gamified cyber learning platform, Project Ares for advanced cyber training. We wish you a safe and happy holiday season!

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Operation Gratitude: 5 Reasons to Give Thanks for Cyber Security

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With daily breaches impacting business operations and security, it’s easy to forget about the good ways that cyber security keeps us safe behind the scenes. This holiday season, we’re giving thanks to cyber security and all that it does to make our lives easier and more secure with what we’re calling Operation Gratitude (inspired by our Project Ares missions, uniquely titled “Operation Goatherd” or “Operation Desert Whale”). #OperationGratitude is a rally cry for security professionals and business leaders to remember the positive aspects of cyber security and share those positive thoughts with each other. Too often we live in fear from cyber attacks and persistent threats, and while, there is always cause for concern, we must remember how advances in the field have equally made aspects of our digital life easier. We’re thankful for these advances in cyber security:

  1. Two-factor authentication – This tool helps to keep you secure by requiring two different credentials before allowing you to gain access to sensitive information online. One example of this would be when you log in to check your bank statements and it prompts you to not only enter your username and password, but also to check your phone and enter a verification code that was texted to you. You will normally see this security precaution used when logging into an account from a new device. The great part about it is, it’s widely known and used by everyone from CISOs to high school kids.
  2. HTTP(S) – You’ve likely seen this appear when visiting a URL online, usually showing up just before the “www” and website name. Http means HyperText Transfer Protocol. HTTP is the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web, which defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands. The “S” is for security, and this little letter means that all communication between your browser and your website is encrypted for your protection. This means that sites utilizing https are prioritizing your safety while performing sensitive transactions online!
  3. Personal digital responsibility – These days the average consumer is more connected than ever. With our lives relying on smartphones, computers, tablets, and a multitude of IoT devices, we are entrenched in cyber every single day. This reliance requires us to practice personal digital responsibility, or often called digital citizenship—that is, the ability to participate safely, intelligently, productively, and responsibly in the digital world. Just because we are more connected does not necessarily mean that we are more aware of cyber risks, however, initiatives such as Cyber Security Awareness Month (in October) are helping to increase awareness by promoting cyber citizenship and education. Circadence is proud to contribute to the security awareness and digital responsibility effort with the soon-to-be-available inCyt, a security awareness game of strategy that helps bring cyber safe practices into the workplace and cultivates good cyber hygiene for all (and you don’t have to be a technical expert to use it).
  4. Corporate security awareness trainings – Given that 25% of all data breaches in the U.S in 2018 were due to carelessness or user error, it is critical for companies of all sizes to engage their employees in persistent cyber training. Thank goodness there is an increase in organizations such as the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) that provide risk assessments and security training to organizations across the U.S.
  5. Increased security collaboration – With more than 4,000 ransomware attacks alone occurring daily, no one business can mitigate the increasing amount of cyber risks present in today’s threatscape. It is more important than ever for businesses to share knowledge from breaches they have experienced and stand together to fight cyber crime, which is exactly what they’re doing! Nowadays these partnerships are being formed not only to share information, but to conduct live fire cyber readiness exercises. One such initiative is DHS’s National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center(NCCIC) – a 24/7 cyber situational awareness, management and response center serving as a national nexus of cyber and communications integration for the federal government, intelligence community, and law enforcement. The NCCIC also shares information among public and private sector partners to build awareness of vulnerabilities, incidents, and mitigations.

So, as you prepare your Thanksgiving meal from recipes pulled up on your tablet, with holiday music playing from your smart phone, and timers set by Alexa to ensure the juiciest turkey and tastiest pies, remember to give thanks for cyber security. We certainly are!

 

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Living our Mission Blog Series: Supporting Cyber Red Teams, with Consultations and Pen Testing from Josiah Bryan

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While Circadence is proud to be a pioneer that has developed innovative cyber learning products to strengthen readiness at all levels of business, there’s one professional area at Circadence that doesn’t tend to get the limelight, until now. Meet Josiah Bryan, principle Security Architect for Circadence’s security consultation services, aptly called Advanced Red Team Intrusion Capabilities (ARTIC for short). For almost two years, Josiah has provided support and services to Red Teams around the country, those leading-edge professionals who test and challenge the security readiness of a system by assuming adversarial roles and hacker points of view.

Josiah enjoys doing penetration testing and exploit development with Red Teams at a variety of companies to help them understand what a bad actor might try to do to compromise their security systems.

But Josiah wasn’t always on the offensive side of cyber security in his professional career. He was first introduced to the “blue team,” or the defensive side of cyber, when he began participating in Capture the Flag competitions across the U.S. during his time as a computer science student at Charleston Southern University. Those competitions also exposed him to the offensive side of security training and he never looked back.

After graduation, he took a job in San Diego with the U.S. Navy as a DoD civilian, finding vulnerabilities in critical infrastructure, which were then reported up to the Department of Homeland Security.

“Learning how the DoD operates internally and how they conduct penetration tests/security evaluations was an extremely valuable skill and great background for my current job at Circadence,” he says.

In addition to consulting with Red Teams, Josiah uses a variety of tools to show and tell companies about existing vulnerabilities. For example, badge scanners that let people gain access to a facility or room are quite common devices for Josiah and his team to test for customers. He might also use USB implants that provide full access to workstations and wireless signal identification devices.

“We show people how easy it is to get credentials off of someone’s badge and gain access to an area,” he says. “They never believe we will find vulnerabilities but when we do, they realize how much they need to do to improve their cyber readiness,” he adds.

But, ultimately Josiah’s favorite part of his job is the level of research and analysis he gets to do. “We are a research team, first,” he says. “We are pushing the boundaries in cybersecurity and discovering new ways that bad actors might take advantage of companies, before they actually do.  It’s a great feeling to help companies and Red Teams see the ‘light’ before the hackers get them,” he adds.

Whether circumventing a security measure or patching a system, Josiah’s contributions to the field are significant.

“Finding new ways to help people understand the importance of strong cyber hygiene is fulfilling,” he says. “We can’t stress it enough in today’s culture where attacks are so dynamic and hackers are always looking for ways to take advantage of companies.”

To stay on the cutting edge of Red Team support, Josiah follows Circadence’s philosophy to persistently learn new ways to protect people and companies. “Any company is only as good as the least trained person,” Josiah says.

 

Why Alternatives to Traditional Cyber Training Are Needed Immediately

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Are you looking for a more effective, cost-conscious cyber training tool that actually teaches competencies and cyber skills? We’ve been there. Let us share our perspective on the top cyber training alternatives to complement or supplement your organization’s current training efforts.

Cyber training has evolved over the years but not at pace with the rapid persistence of cybercrime. Cyberattacks impact businesses of all sizes and it’s only a matter of time before your business is next in line. Traditional cyber training has been comprised of individuals sitting in a classroom environment, off-site, reading static materials, listening to lectures, and if you’re lucky, performing step-by-step, prescriptive tasks to “upskill” and “learn.” Unfortunately, this model isn’t working anymore. Learners are not retaining concepts and are disengaged from the learning process. This means by the time they make it back to your company to defend your networks, they’ve likely forgotten most of the new concepts that you sent them to learn about in the first place. Read more on the disadvantages of passive cyber training here.

So, what cyber training alternatives are available for building competency and skill among professionals? More importantly, why do you need a better way to train professionals? We hope this blog helps answer these questions.

Cyber Range Training

Cyber ranges provide trainees with simulated (highly scalable, small number of servers) or emulated (high fidelity testing using real computers, OS, and application) environments to practice skills such as defending networks, hardening critical infrastructure (ICS/SCADA) and responding to attacks. They simulate realistic technical settings for professionals to practice network configurations and detect abnormalities and anomalies in computer systems. While simulated ranges are considered more affordable than emulated ranges, several academic papers question whether test results from a simulation reflect a cyber pro’s workplace reality.

Traditional Cyber Security Training

Courses can be taken in a classroom setting from certified instructors (like a SANS course), self-paced over the Internet, or in mentored settings in cities around the world. Several organizations offer online classes too, for professionals looking to hone their skills in their specific work role (e.g. incident response analyst, ethical hacker). Online or in-classroom training environments are almost exclusively built to cater to offensive-type cyber security practices and are highly prescriptive when it comes to the learning and the process for submitting “answers”/ scoring.

However, as cyber security proves to be largely a “learn by doing” skillset, where outside-of-the-box thinking, real-world, high fidelity virtual environments, and on-going training are crucially important, attendees of traditional course trainings are often left searching for more cross-disciplined opportunities to hone their craft over the long term. Nevertheless, online trainings prove a good first step for professionals who want foundational learnings from which they can build upon with more sophisticated tools and technologies.

Gamified, Cyber Range, Cloud-Based Training

It wouldn’t be our blog if we didn’t mention Project Ares as a recommended, next generation alternative to traditional cyber training for professionals because it uses gamified backstories to engage learners in activities.  And, it combines the benefits and convenience of online, cyber range training with the power of AI and machine learning to automate and augment trainee’s cyber competencies.

Our goal is to create a learning experience that is engaging, immersive, fun, and challenges trainee thinking in ways most authentic to cyber scenarios they’d experience in their actual jobs.

Project Ares was built with an active-learning approach to teaching, which studies show increase information retention among learners to 75% compared to passive-learning models.

Check out the comparison table below for details on the differences between traditional training models and what Project Ares delivers.

Traditional Training
(classroom and online delivery of lectured based material)
Project Ares
(immersive environment for hands on, experiential learning)
Curriculum Design

  • Instructors are generally experts in their field and exceptional classroom facilitators.
  • Often hired to develop a specific course.
  • It can take up to a year to build a course and it might be used for as long as 5 years, with updates.
  • Instructors are challenged to keep pace with evolving threats and to update course material frequently enough to reflect today’s attack surface in real time.
  • It is taught the same way every time.
Curriculum Design

  • Cyber subject matter experts partner with instructional design specialists to reengineer real-world threat scenarios into immersive, learning-based exercises.
  • An in-game advisor serves as a resource for players to guide them through activities, minimizing the need for physical instructors and subsequent overhead.
  • Project Ares is drawn from real-world threats and attacks, so content is always relevant and updated to meet user’s needs.
Learning Delivery

  • Courses are often concept-specific going deep on a narrow subject. And it can take multiple courses to cover a whole subject area.
  • Students take the whole course or watch the whole video – for example, if a student knows 70%, they sit through that to get to the 30% that is new to them.
  • On Demand materials are available for reference (sometimes for an additional fee) and are helpful for review of complex concepts.   But this does not help student put the concepts into practice.
  • Most courses teach offensive concepts….from the viewpoint that it is easier to teach how to break the network and then assumes that students will figure out how to ‘re-engineer’ defense. This approach can build a deep foundational understanding of concepts but it is not tempered by practical ‘application’ until students are back home facing real defensive challenges.
Learning  Delivery

  • Wherever a user is in his/her cyber security career path, Project Ares meets them at their level and provides a curriculum pathway.
  • From skills to strategy:   Students / Players can use the Project Ares platform to refresh skills, learn new skills, test their capabilities on their own and, most critically, collaborate with teammates to combine techniques and critical thinking to successfully reach the end of a mission.
  • It takes a village to defend a network, sensitive data, executive leaders, finances, and an enterprises reputation:  This approach teaches and enables experience of the many and multiple skills and job roles that come together in the real-world to detect and respond to threats and attacks….
  • Project Ares creates challenging environments that demand the kind of problem solving and strategic thinking necessary to create an effective and evolving defensive posture
  • Project Ares Battle Rooms and Missions present real-world problems that need to be solved, not just answered. It is a higher-level learning approach.

If you want to learn more about Project Ares and how it stacks up to other training options out there, watch our on-demand webinar “Get Gamified: Why Cyber Learning Happens Better With Games” featuring our VP of Global Partnerships, Keenan Skelly.

  You can also contact our experts at info@circadence.com or schedule a demo to see it in action!

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Help Wanted: Combating the Cyber Skills Gap

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Recent news headlines frequently communicate about the massive shortage of cyber skills in the industry so we wanted to dig deeper into this phenomenon to find out why there’s a talent shortage and what can be done about it. Cyberattacks are permeating every commercial and government sector out there yet industry and analyst reports indicate there isn’t a large enough talent pool of defenders to keep pace with evolving threats. When data is compromised and there aren’t enough cyber security staff to secure the front lines, we ALL are at risk of identity theft, monetary losses, reputational damage, fines, and operational disruption. cy

Statistics on the Cyber Skills and Talent Gap

With more than one in four organizations experiencing an advanced persistent threat (APT) attack and when 97 percent of those APT’s are considered a credible threat to national security and economic stability, it’s no wonder the skills shortage is on everyone’s mind.

A report from Frost & Sullivan found that the global cybersecurity workforce will have more than 1.8 million unfilled positions by 2020 (that’s next year!) while some sources report a 3.5 million shortfall by 2021.

It begs several questions:

  • What’s causing the shortage of cybersecurity skills? According to a Deloitte report, the lack of effective training opportunities and risk of attrition may be to blame.
  • Is there really a shortage of talent? Hacker, security evangelist, and cyber security professional Alyssa Miller thinks there is more of a cyber talent disconnect between job seeker’s expectations of what a job entails versus what employer’s demand from a prospective candidate.
  • How do we fill these cyber positions? A study of 2,000 American adults found that nearly 80% of adults never considered cyber security careers. Why? Sheer unawareness. Most had never even heard of specific cyber job roles like a penetration tester and software engineer and others were deterred by their lack of education, interest, and knowledge about how to launch a cyber career.

Strategies to Minimize the Cybersecurity Skills Shortage

Given the pervasive nature of cyber security attacks, businesses can’t afford to wait around for premiere talent to walk through the door. Companies need to take a proactive and non-traditional approach to hiring talent—and, yes, it takes effort.

Miller suggests that recruiters “must learn to engage security professionals through less traditional avenues. The best security recruiters have learned how to connect with the community via social media. They’ve learned how to have meaningful interactions on Twitter and are patient in their approach.”

Whether looking to fill a position in digital forensics or computer programming or network defense or even cyber law, the skills required for those positions can be taught with the right tools. Companies should learn to be flexible with those requirements as many are now filling unopened positions by hiring and then teaching and training professionals on preferred cyber skills and competencies. Recruiters need to adopt a paradigm shift during the talent search and be more comfortable hiring for character and cultural fit first, then, training for skills development.

Fill the talent pipeline

Consider hiring people with different industry backgrounds or skill sets to bring new ideas to the table. Sometimes, getting an “outside” perspective on the challenges firms are facing sheds a new light because they notice nuances and inconsistencies that internal teams, who are in the day-to-day, may not see immediately. Look for passionate candidates with an eagerness to learn.

Companies today are prioritizing skills, knowledge, and willingness to learn over degrees and career fields because they know that some things cannot be taught in a classroom such as: curiosity, passion, problem-solving, and strong ethics.

Look for individuals with real-world experience

If you happen to have candidates in your pipeline that have industry knowledge, ask about their real-world experience. Inquire about the kinds of things they’ve learned in their previous position and get them to share how they remedied attacks. Create a checklist of skills you desire from a candidate that may include identity management, incident response management, system administration, network design and security, and hacking methodologies, to name a few. Learning how they dealt with real situations will reveal a lot about their personality, character, and skill set.

Re-examine job postings

Often a job posting is the only thing compelling a candidate to apply for a position. If the job posting is simply a laundry list of skills requirements and degree preferences, it may deter candidates who have those skills but also seek to work for a company that values innovation, creativity, and strategic vision. Read descriptions carefully to determine if they portray the culture of your organization. If a cultural vibe is lacking, it may be time to inject a sense of corporate personality to attract the right candidates.

Provide continuous professional development opportunities

With advances in technology, professionals need to be on top of the latest trends and tools to succeed in their job. That is why it is vital to re-skill and persistently train cybersecurity professionals so they can prepare for anything that comes their way—and you can retain your top talent. Conferences, webinars and certifications are not for everyone—so it is important to find growth opportunities that employees want to pursue for both their personal as well as their professional benefit.

Create a culture of empowerment for retention

CISOs can set expectations early in the hiring process so candidates understand how their specific role impacts the organization. For example, during the interview process, notify candidates of your expectation that they be “students of the industry” such that they are expected to stay on top of security news and happenings.

Gartner advocates for a “people-centric security” approach where stacks of tools are secondary to the powerful human element of security. Additionally, send out quarterly or bi-monthly roundups of the latest cyber security news and events to keep your team abreast of current affairs. Making it as easy as possible for them to be “students of the industry” increases the likelihood that they will remain current on industry developments and engaged in their role.

Invest in Cyber Training to Cultivate Talent

Executives are demonstrating their support for strong info security programs by increasing hiring budgets, supporting the development of info security operation centers (SOCs) and providing CISOs with the resources they need to build strong teams.

With the right talent, you will have a better chance of successfully defeating attackers, staying aware of current threats, and protecting your team, your company—and your job. These strategies will go a long way in preventing future attacks and preparing staff and systems to respond when things go awry. The cyber security staffing shortage is no longer just a cyber security department issue—it’s a global business risk issue.

 

Living Our Mission Blog Series: Building Hyper-Scalable Cyber Training Experiences with Randy Thornton, Enterprise Architect at Circadence

Reading Time: 3 minutes

A newly minted Engineering Fellow, Randy Thornton has dedicated his craft to software development for over 30 years. His passion for learning and using new technologies is evident in Circadence’s cyber range platform, Project AresÒ.

Randy joined Circadence in 2005 when the company was selling its WAN Optimization product, MVOÔ. His background in scientific computing software for CAD/CAM, telecom, and seismology have all been brought to bear to transform Project Ares from a mere cool idea that met unique market demands, to now, a full-fidelity, hyper-scalable range training tool for cyber security professionals used worldwide.

Randy and Circadence: Then and Now

In the beginning, there were about four Circadence employees working on the Project Ares prototype, which was eventually adopted by government and military agencies who were looking for better ways to train their cyber operators. Fast forward to today, Randy is leading the Project Ares team to redesign the architecture to scale within Microsoft Azure.  The goal is to provide private sector enterprises the same cutting-edge opportunity to train their cyber teams of any size and location on a gamified range—persistently, authentically, with flexibility and relevant to their specific cyber readiness needs. And Randy has been there through it all!

Today Randy mentors the engineering team at Circadence and helps them identify and collate standards around how the company’s products’ code is written and tested. He also helps identify what technologies to use and evaluates the technical feasibility of using new tech in the products themselves.

“Researching and learning new technology and staying on the cutting-edge is one of the most exciting parts of my job,” said Randy. “I see so much potential for Project Ares…so much promise…and being able to build out complicated networks in the cloud is a welcomed challenge for me.” he added.

Fellow Designation Reflected in Technical Capabilities within Project Ares

Randy’s contributions have been celebrated with a promotion to an Engineering Fellow, a significant career milestone that honors his achievements, expertise, and technical leadership to Project Ares, Circadence, and the cyber security industry as a whole.  The well-deserved recognition clearly stems from the fact that Randy never stops learning! He recently completed his Azure architecture certification exam, which helps him contribute to transitioning Project Ares to run on Microsoft Azure intelligent cloud.

“Project Ares’ ability to scale across regions is even more prevalent now thanks to Microsoft Azure,” said Randy. “The usability, the functionality, and its capability to connect across multiple locations and look like one single installation will be very beneficial to enterprise and government entities looking to scale their cyber training efforts effectively.”

A professional motto that drives Randy’s belief in continuous innovation in Project Ares is “Every time we change code, we should improve it.” It is this technical philosophy that has kept Randy and the Circadence engineering team on their toes and moving at pace to meeting market demands for scalable cyber training experiences.

Evolving Cyber Training to Scale for Customers

Randy’s current project lies in Project Ares.Next, an evolution of Project Ares from an on-premise application to a true cloud native SaaS platform that fully exploits the advantages of the cloud computing model.  Many of the cloud native improvements for Project Ares will be “under the covers”.  But customers will see performance improvements in mission virtual machines and new cyber curriculum will be able to be added to the platform more expeditiously. Project Ares users who want to train their teams from anywhere in the world will be able to do so persistently, without compromising user experience and impacting mission load times, etc.

As Project Ares evolves, we start to adapt to Go and Google standards and Kubernetes standards,” said Randy. “We’ve been working closely with Microsoft engineering teams on how we use the Azure Cloud most effectively and efficiently,” he adds.

The work of Randy and his teams is technical in nature and we greatly appreciate the level of knowledge and expertise they have to ensure Project Ares stays on the cusp of cyber training market demands using the latest technology to automate and augment the cyber workforces of tomorrow. We are grateful for their work to make Project Ares better every day as they use their talents to inform what our customers experience in the platform.

Learn Project Ares, including recent mission and battle room updates!

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Living our Mission: Creating Authentic Cyber Training and Learning Environments Inspired by Real-World Experience: Todd Humes, Sr. Mission Designer

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Bringing his Air Force and military security engineering background to use, Senior Mission Designer Todd Humes understands what it takes to defend networks from adversaries. Prior to Circadence, he served in various government security roles including as a Systems Security Engineer and Systems Administrator and on the commercial side as a Director of Network Defense Operations at a Managed Security Service Provider. He noticed a gap in commercial cyber training and readiness that eventually lead him to Circadence.  

In his current role, Todd ensures that real-world training exercises developed meet critical training objectives and are authentic for the end-user. “We want to provide a safe place for trainees to learn cyber…so he/she doesn’t have to worry about causing damage on actual networks when trying to build skills,” he says.  

It’s important trainees in Project Ares experience true-to-life cyber threat scenarios that they would in their actual workplace.

In “mimicking a controlled environment that they would see” in the workplace, trainees gain “an experience that is highly relatable and allows for professional development,” Todd says.  

When developing new missions Todd and his team examine market verticals and threats associated with those industries to identify unique scenarios that can be built out in a Project Ares mission. “We do our own research and threat intelligence targeting verticals, brainstorm specific scenarios and begin designing what the network environment should look like,” he says. The automation and orchestration of how the mission will unfold require a great deal of programming. Between building the mission components, the layout, and the services that will be “affected” in the exercise, Todd and his team bring cyber threats to life in the most authentic way possible. Sometimes, he adds, “we have to reverse engineer the malware [for example] to get the capability we want,” adding layers of complexity and back-end work to produce the final product.  

But the intricacies of building missions is anything but dull. “It’s never boring! We’re always learning day in and day out and the people who are successful in this field are the individuals who continue to learn themselves,” Todd says.

To ensure missions stay relevant against today’s threats, Todd is always keeping a pulse on the latest research and vulnerabilities by studying online reports and attending cyber conferences and industry-related events to network with like-minded leaders.  

He believes by continuously learning about the industry, all professionals in this line of work and beyond can find new and better ways to address an exploit and stay one (or several) steps ahead of hackers. He considers cyber security one the few industries and specializations that requires persistent learning and skill building in order to “extend the life” of security across organizations and companies.   

Learn Project Ares, including recent mission and battle room updates here.   

Cyber Security and the Baby Boomer, Gen X Populations

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We all have someone in our lives who isn’t tech-savvy They don’t know how to convert a word doc into a PDF, or they try to do a Google search on Facebook, or they seem to struggle with the ‘simple’ act of text messagingThese are not uncommon missteps when using smart devices for people who didn’t grow up with Siri ® (let alone the Internet!) at their fingertips. While these mistakes seem harmless or even comical at times, there can be much more serious cyber security consequences.  

Baby Boomer and Generation X populations (born 1946-64 and 1965-76) are a growing target for scammers because they are a largely trustworthy population made up of financially successful people. And some of the oldest may have cognition and memory ailments. The American Journal of Public Health estimates that about 5of the Baby Boomer population, (about 2 to 3 million people)experience from some sort of scam every year. The Federal Bureau of Investigation cites that older adults lose more than 3 billion dollars a year to financial scams. 

Some of the most common forms of cyber threats that vulnerable Baby Boomers can fall victim to are impersonation scams, or fraud. This is a kind of deception involving trickery and deceit that leads unsuspecting victims to give money, property, or personal information in exchange for something they perceive as valuable or worth protecting. According to Scam Watch, in 2019 so far 10,297 scams have been reported in the 55-64 age range, and 13,323 scams have been reported in those 65 and older.  

Here are some of the top types of scams used against this population: 

  • Medicare, health insurance, and pharmacy scams in which perpetrators may pose as a Medicare representative or provide bogus healthcare services for patients in order to gain access to their personal information. They may also be persuaded to buy unsafe or fake prescription medication that may harm their health. 
  • Sweepstakes and lottery fraud occur when an advertisement pops up saying you’re the lucky winner in a random website sweepstakes. This is a ploy to get people to enter their personal information, including address and credit card number in order to “claim a prize” or win money.
  • Sweetheart scams seem unusually cruel. With a majority of the Baby Boomer population dealing with the death of a loved one or children leaving home, maybe living alone for the first time, loneliness can creep in. Scammers in these scenarios pretend to be a love interest of the victim and eventually ask for money to help support them. 

The good news is that we can help the most vulnerable in this population avoid falling victim to a scamWe can have conversations to stimulate awareness of online and phone safety practices, make frequent visits and facilitate discussions about monthly bills and medications, and destigmatizing fear or embarrassment to come forward if they find they have been taken advantage of (waiting to rectify the situation could only make things worse). You can report scams to a number of organizations, including the FBI, Social Security Administration, Federal Trade Commission, or your bank or retirement facility. 

 Don’t wait until it’s too late, have important conversations with loved ones of all ages and ensure they feel empowered to make smart decisions online. 

When cyber security meets machine learning

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What happens when cyber security and machine learning work together? The results are pretty positive. Many technologies are leveraging machine learning in cyber security functions nowadays in order to automate and augment their cyber workforce. How? Most recently in training and skill building.

Machine learning helps emulate human cognition (e.g. learning based on experiences and patterns rather than inference) so autonomous agents in a cyber security system for instance, can “teach themselves” how to build models for pattern recognition—while engaging with real human cyber professionals.

Machine learning as a training support system

Machine learning becomes particularly valuable in cyber security training for professionals when it can support human activities like malware detection, incident response, network analysis, and more. One way machine learning shows up is in our gamified cyber learning platform Project Ares, under our AI-advisor “Athena” who generates responses to player’s queries when they get stuck on an activity and/or need hints to progress through a problem.

Athena generates a response from its learning corpus, using machine learning to aggregate and correlate all player conversations it has, while integrating knowledge about each player in the platform to recommend the most efficient path to solving a problem. It’s like modeling the “two heads are better than one” saying, but with a lot more “heads” at play.

Machine learning as an autonomous adversary

Likewise, machine learning models provide a general mechanism for organization-tailored obscuring of malicious intent during professional training—enabling adversaries to disguise their network traffic or on-system behavior to look more typical to evade detection. Machine learning’s ability to continually model and adapt enables the technology to persist undetected for longer (if it is acting as an autonomous agent against a trainee in our platform). This act challenges the trainee in the platform in a good way, so they begin to think like an adversary and understand their response to defensive behavior.

Machine learning supports cyber skills building

Companies like Uber use machine learning to understand the various routes a driver takes to transport people from point A to point B. It uses data collected to recommend the most efficient route to its destination.

It increases the learning potential for professionals looking to hone their cyber skills and competencies using machine learning.

Now imagine that concept applied to cyber training in a way that can both help cyber pros through cyber activities while also activating a trainee’s cognitive functions in ways we previously could not with traditional, off-site courses.

Machine learning abilities can analyze user behavior for both fraud detection and malicious network activity. It can aggregate and enrich data from multiple sources, act as virtual assistants with specialized knowledge, and augment cyber operators’ daily tasks. It’s powerful stuff!

To learn more about machine learning and AI in cyber training, download our white paper “Upskilling Cyber Teams with Artificial Intelligence and Gamified Learning.”

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