Ransomware – The Attack Du Jour!

Ransomware is gaining traction among hackers; emboldened by financial success and anonymity using cryptocurrencies. In fact, ransomware is now considered a tried and true cyberattack technique, with attacks spreading among small and medium-sized businesses, cities and county governments. Coveware’s recent 2019 Q1 Ransomware Report notes:

  • Ransoms have increased by an average of 89% over Q1 in 2019 to $12,762 per ransom request
  • Average downtime after a ransomware attack has increased to 7.3 days, up from 6.2 days in Q4 of 2018, with estimated downtime costs averaging $65,645
  • Victim company size so far in 2019 is anywhere from 28 to 254 employees (small, medium, and large-sized businesses)

Let’s review how ransomware works and why it’s so effective. Ransomware is a type of cyberattack where an unauthorized user gains access to an organization’s files or systems and blocks user access, holding the company’s data hostage until the victim pays a ransom in exchange for a decryption key. As you can surmise, the goal of such an attack is to extort businesses for financial gain.

Ransomware can “get into” a system in different ways, one of the most common through phishing emails or social media where the human worker inadvertently opens a message, attachment, or link acting as a door to the network or system.  Messages that are urgent and appear to come from a supervisor, accounts payable professional, or perceived “friends” on social media are all likely ransomware actors disguising themselves to manipulate or socially engineer the human.

Near and Far: Ransomware Has No Limits

Many types of ransomware have affected small and medium-sized businesses over the last two decades but it shows no limitations in geography, frequency, type, or company target size.

  • Norwegian aluminum manufacturing company Norsk Hydro, a significant provider of hydroelectric power in the Nordic region, was shut down because of a ransomware infection. The company’s aluminum plants were forced into manual operations and the costs are already projected to reach $40 million (and growing). The ransomware name: LockerGoga. It has crippled industrial firms across the globe from French engineering firm Altran, and manufacturing companies Momentive, and Hexion, according to a report from Wired.
  • What was perceived as an unplanned system reboot at Maersk, a Danish shipping conglomerate, turned out to be a corrupt attack that impacted one-fifth of the entire world’s shipping capacity. Deemed the “most devastating cyberattack in history,” NotPetya created More than $10 billion in damages. To add insult to injury, the cyber risk insurance company for Maersk denied their claim on the grounds that the NotPetya attack was a result of cyberwar (citing an act of war exclusionary clause).  WannaCry was also released in 2017 and generated between $4 billion and $8 billion in damages but nothing (yet) has come close to NotPetya.
  • On Black Friday 2016, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency fell victim to a ransomware attack. The attacker demanded $73,000 for services to be restored. Fortunately, speedy response and backup processes helped the company restore systems in 2 days—avoiding having to pay the ransom. In March 2018, the City of Atlanta experienced a ransomware attack that cost upwards of $17 million in damages. The Colorado Department of Transportation fell victim, too, left with a bill totaling almost $2 million.

These headlines are stories of a digital war that has no geographical borders or structured logic. No one is truly immune to ransomware, and any company that thinks that way is likely not as prepared as they think they are. Beazley Breach Response (BBR) Services found a 105% increase in the number of ransomware attack notifications against clients in Q1 2019 compared to Q1 of 2018, as well as noting that attackers are shifting focus to targeting larger organizations and demanding higher ransom payments than ever before.

Immersive cyber ranges – Protect Yourself, Your Business, Your People

If your own security efforts, staff practices, and business infrastructure are continuously hardened every time a new breach headline makes the news, the things that matter most to you and your company will be better protected. One of the ways to consistently harden security practices is via immersive and persistent training on gamified cyber ranges. Some benefits of using cyber ranges like this include:

  • Helping professionals of all skill levels learn and apply preventative measures such as: regular backups, multi-factor authentication, and incident response planning and analysis.
  • Understanding what ransomware looks like and how it would “work” if it infected their company’s network.
  • Cloud-based environments can scale to emulate any size digital system and help users “see” and respond to threats in safe spaces.
  • Providing user assistance and immediate feedback in terms of rewards, badges, and progress indicators, allowing organizational leaders who want to upskill their cyber teams to see the skills gaps and strengths in their teams and identify ways to harden their defenses.

When ransomware does come knocking at your business door, will you be ready to recover from the costly and reputational damages? If there is any shred of doubt in your mind, then it’s time to re-evaluate your cyber readiness strategy. As we’ve learned, even the smallest vulnerability or level of uncertainty is enough for a cybercriminal to take hold.

Photo by Michael Geiger on Unsplash and via website.

Cyber Attacks and Risk Mitigation in Critical Infrastructure

Critical infrastructure is a term used by the government to describe assets that are essential for the functioning of a society and economy (think oil and gas, water, electricity, telecommunication, etc.). According to the Department of Homeland Security, there are 16 sectors of critical infrastructure. In the past few years, we’ve seen attacks on departments of transportation, cities, and other network infrastructure that are prompting many cyber security leaders to pay closer attention to their readiness strategy and risk management. With the threat of cyberattacks against public and private sector infrastructure on the rise, it is important to understand the history of these attacks, as well as what critical infrastructure cyber security professionals can do to protect themselves against them. Today, we are going to focus on three sectors: oil and gas, energy and electricity, and transportation.

Oil & Gas Cyber Security

Much of how we live and work is dependent upon the energy produced from oil and gas production, including cooking, heating/cooling, driving, and use of electronic devices and appliances. There have been several successful attacks on this industry already:

  • One of the most famous noted attacks came in 2010 with Stuxnet, a malicious computer worm used to hijack industrial control systems (ICS) around the globe, including computers used to manage oil refineries, gas pipelines, and power plants. It reportedly destroyed a fifth of Iran’s nuclear centrifuges. The worm was delivered through a worker’s thumb drive.
  • In August 2012, an unauthorized user with privileged access to one of the world’s leading National Oil Companies’ (NOCs’) computers unleashed a computer virus called Shamoon (disk-wiping malware). This virus erased three quarters (30,000) of the company’s corporate personal computer data and resulted in an immediate shutdown of the company’s internal network.
  • National Security Authority Norway said 50 companies in the oil sector were hacked and 250 more were warned to check their systems, in one of the biggest hacks in Norway’s history.
  • Ugly Gorilla, a Chinese attacker who invaded the control systems of utilities in the United States, gained cyber keys necessary to access systems that regulate flow of natural gas. In January 2015, a device used to monitor the gasoline levels at refueling stations was remotely accessed by online attackers, manipulated to cause alerts, and set to shut down the flow of fuel. Several gas-tank-monitoring systems suffered electronic attacks thought to be instigated by hacktivist groups.
  • In December 2018, Sapeim fell victim to a cyberattack that hit servers based in the Middle East, India, Aberdeen and Italy.The attack led to cancellation of important data and infrastructures.

Energy & Electricity Cyber Security

While we may not think of the energy sector as being a large cyber vulnerability, it is not only of intrinsic importance to a functioning society but necessary for all other sectors that make up the nation’s critical infrastructure.

There are not many documented cases of a successful power grid attack but that doesn’t mean they don’t occur! The first known instance taking place on December 23, 2015 in Ukraine. Hackers were able to compromise information systems of three energy distribution companies in the Ukraine and temporarily disrupt electric supply to end customers. A year later, Russian hackers targeted a transmission level substation, blacking out part of Kiev.

Although there may not be many examples of historical energy utility hacks, these kinds of attacks are no longer a theoretical concern. In 2014, Admiral Michael Rogers, director of the National Security Agency, testified before Congress that China and other countries likely had the capability to shut down the U.S. power grid. An adversary with the capability to exploit vulnerabilities within the electric utility silo may be motivated to carry out such an attack under a variety of circumstances, and it seems increasingly likely that the next war will be cyber.

Transportation Cyber Security

Via plane, train, or automobile, the transportation sector supports nearly 10 percent of the U.S. GDP (gross domestic product), which includes monetary value of all goods and services produced within the United States. Over the past couple of years, the industry has grown in operational complexity with logistical chains, production, facility and manufacturing partners and plant management. As a result of this growth, it has become an even more alluring and accessible hacking playground for cybercriminals. There have been a few noteworthy attacks on this silo of infrastructure in the last few years:

  • Maersk: Petyamalware variant infected the IT systems of the world’s largest shipping company with 600 container vessels handling 15% of the world’s seaborne trade in June 2017.
  • LOT: A Polish airline canceled 10 flights due to an attack against the airline’s ground computer systems at Warsaw’s Okecieairport in June 2015.
  • Jeep Cherokee: A coordinated attack in 2015 by Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek demonstrated the ease by which a connected car can be remotely hacked into, in this case, using Uconnect.

 

You can see that attacks on these silos of industry have already begun (and show no signs of stopping) and we need to be prepared for what the future holds. To lessen the attack surface vulnerabilities and protect critical infrastructure against cyber threats, teams need to be prepared to address all possible scenarios that can occur on said attack surface in order to effectively protect and defend IT and OT critical infrastructures.

Reducing Risk in Critical Infrastructure Cyber Security

Project Ares® cyber security learning platform can prepare cyber teams with the right skills in immersive environments that emulate their own IT and OT networks to be most effective. In fact, there are exercises within the cyber range platform that have players detect threats on a water treatment plant and in an oil and gas refinery. It is designed for continuous learning, meaning it is constantly evolving with new missions rapidly added to address the latest threats in any critical infrastructure sector. Further, targeted training can be achieved from the library of battle room scenarios to work on specific skill sets like digital forensics, scripting and Linux.

Training in cyber ranges is a great way to foster collaboration, accountability, and communication skills among your cyber team as well as cross-departmentally. Persistent and hands-on learning will help take your cyber team to the next level. Benefits of this kinds of learning include:

  • Increased engagement – by keeping learners engaged they are able to stay focused on the subject matter at hand
  • Opportunities to close gaps immediately – instant feedback, instruction, and critique make it easy for learners to benefit from interaction with the instructor and peers and immediately implement this feedback to improve
  • Risk mitigation and improved problem solving – hands-on training allows learners to master skills prior to working in real-world environments. People can work through tough scenarios in a safe training environment – developing problem-solving skills without risk.

By placing the power of security in human hands, cyber security teams can proactively improve a company’s ability to detect cyber-related security breaches or anomalous behavior, resulting in earlier detection and less impact of such incidence on energy delivery, thereby lowering overall business risk. Humans are the last line of defense against today’s adversary, so prioritizing gamified training for teams will foster the level of collaboration, transparency, and expertise needed to connect the dots for cyber security across these critical infrastructure sectors.

Photo by Ian Simmonds on Unsplash

Computer Fraud and Security – Gamification as a Winning Strategy

In this “game of protection’ to balance defensive and offensive security techniques, now is the time for CISOs and business leaders to reach for a new cyber security manual – one that leverages gamification.

Nichols College Students Spearhead Cyber Security Education for the Entire Campus 

Policy makers are now prioritizing data security over talent, efficiency and controlling costs. As students growing up and being educated in the digital age, we are just starting to understand the importance of cyber security to individuals and their companies. Taking part in a Research Associate Internship on campus at Nichols College, our eyes have been opened to the vast number of threats we face on a daily basis.

Oracle conducted a study titled “Security in the Age of Artificial Intelligence,” where 341 C-Suite executives and 110 policy makers were asked of their plans to improve their company’s security in the next two years. The top answer from this sample was to train existing staff. Human error poses the greatest risk to these companies (Oracle). In order to mitigate this risk, it is imperative to understand the opportunity cost of training employees on the importance of cybersecurity. Prioritizing training would prevent small mistakes, potentially costing a company much more in the long run.

A Nichols College Associate Professor of Accounting and Finance, Bryant Richards, noticed a gap in cyber security education, wanting to bring cyber to campus in a big way, stating “As cyber risks have become ubiquitous throughout the industry, it is our responsibility to provide some degree of cyber literacy to our business students. We must train our accounting students to be data and technology professionals who understand accounting. The realistic and experiential nature of Project Ares matches how our students learn and provides a transformative learning experience.” Richards along with the two of us, helped Nichols partner with Circadence to complete a three-month pilot program of their gamified cybersecurity learning platform Project Ares.

What We Found: Circadence did a great job with Project Ares, with an appealing, gamified user interface that sucks you in and is easy to use. As a student with no technical experience in the cybersecurity field, Project Ares proved to be both engaging and challenging. It provided an abundance of resources through its Media Center and Mini Games. Users can obtain a base layer of knowledge, progressing into education on concepts like the Cyber Kill Chain and how hackers utilize it. The interactive Battle Rooms provide real-life, technical lab environments where users can spin up virtual machines, explore real-world tools, build their confidence, and hone their skills.

What We Learned: You do not have to be a professional hacker to steal someone else’s information or gain access to their computer. Understanding the code is no longer enough; this is much more than an individual problem. If your own device is compromised, the hacker can steal your personal information, and steal information from your employer and worse. This harsh reality surprised us when we first commenced our research. From clicking a wrong link in an email, to accidentally tapping an advertisement banner on your phone; these small errors can seem harmless but are really detrimental to your overall security.

The gamification of cybersecurity training has allowed those of us with no prior knowledge, a chance to get a leg up. With increased demand to train existing staff, new training approaches must be made for the next generation of cybersecurity specialists. Gamifying the process made it easily digestible, directly benefitting any potential company or individual.

The first step in becoming educated on cybersecurity is understanding that there are threats present in our everyday lives. In the words of the man who gave us our initial walkthrough of Project Ares, Brad Wolfenden compared cybersecurity to buying a gallon of milk, saying:

“I believe that part of the disconnect around cybersecurity best practices comes from the assumptions we make as consumers in general – that what we’re buying is designed and sold with our best interests, and security, in mind … The food you buy and eat is certified by the Food & Drug Administration to indicate it has been safely grown/ raised and suitable for human consumption. When making technology purchases, we cannot take these same conveniences for granted.”

It is everyone’s ‘job’ to maintain high ethical standards and awareness when operating on the Internet nowadays. It is no longer up to one person or pre-installed software to protect your personal information. The more we are educated on the basic underlying principles of cybersecurity, the safer we will all be.

References

Oracle. “SECURITY IN THE AGE OF AI .” Oracle, 2018, www.oracle.com/a/ocom/docs/data-security-report.pdf.

Wolfenden, Brad. “A Rising Tide Lifts All Boats: Celebrating National Cybersecurity Awareness Month.” Circadence, 30 Oct. 2018, www.circadence.com/national-cybersecurity-awareness-month/.

*Students R.J. LeBrun & Lorenzo Secola guest authored this blog post as part of their Research Associate Internship at Nichols College 

 

 

 

Circadence deploys gamification training to shrink skills gap – The Last Watchdog

One of the top innovators in the training space is Circadence®. The Boulder, CO-based company got its start in the mid-1990s as a pioneer of massive multi-player  video games. It then took its expertise in moving massive amounts of gaming data and applied it first to training military cyber warfare specialists, and, next, to training security analysts in the enterprise, government and academic communities.

Oil and Gas Cyber Security: Understanding Risks, Consequences, and Proactive Measures

The oil and gas sector is susceptible to security vulnerabilities as it adopts digital communication methods that help power energy production and distribution. For context, there exist approximately 1,793 natural gas-powered electricity plants in the U.S. and they generated 34 percent of the nation’s electricity last year. Much of how we live and work is dependent upon the energy produced from oil and gas production, including everyday cooking, heating/cooling, communication, and use of electronic devices and appliances. Therefore, even the smallest cyber attack on one of the thousands of interconnected and digital systems can yield devasting effects.

A company that goes through an attack can experience a plant shutdown, equipment damage, utilities interruptions, production shutdown, inappropriate product quality, undetected spills, and safety measure violations—to name a few. Recently, 87% of surveyed oil and gas senior executives have reported being affected by cyber incidents in the past 12 months. Further, 46% of attacks in Operational Technology go undetected.

Oil and Gas Cyber Security Breaches throughout History

  • In 2010, Stuxnet, a malicious computer worm, was used to hijack industrial control systems around the globe, including computers used to manage oil refineries, gas pipelines, and power plants. It reportedly destroyed a fifth of Iran’s nuclear centrifuges. The worm was delivered through a worker’s thumb drive.
  • In August 2012, a person with privileged access to one of the world’s leading National Oil Companies’ (NOCs’) computers unleashed a computer virus called Shamoon (disk-wiping malware). This virus erased three quarters (30,000) of the company’s corporate personal computers and resulted in an immediate shutdown of the company’s internal network.
  • National Security Authority Norway said 50 companies in the oil sector were hacked and 250 more were warned to check their systems, in one of the biggest hacks in Norway’s history.
  • Ugly Gorilla, a Chinese attacker who invaded the control systems of utilities in the United States, gained cyber keys necessary to access systems that regulate flow of natural gas. In January 2015, a device used to monitor the gasoline levels at refueling stations across the United States—known as an automated tank gauge or ATG—could be remotely accessed by online attackers, manipulated to cause alerts, and even set to shut down the flow of fuel. Several Guardian AST gas-tank-monitoring systems have suffered electronic attacks possibly instigated by hacktivist groups.
  • In December 2018, Saipem fell victim to a cyber attack that hit servers based in the Middle East, India, Aberdeen and Italy.

These examples show other oil and gas companies the consequences that arise from insecure cyber environments, vulnerable systems, and cyber teams that lack the latest skills to stay ahead of attackers.

How Circadence Can Help

To lessen the attack surface and protect critical infrastructure against cyber threats, teams need to be prepared to address all possible scenarios that can occur on said attack surface in order to effectively protect and defend IT and OT critical infrastructures.

Project Ares® cyber security learning platform can prepare cyber teams with the right skills in immersive environments that emulate their own oil and gas networks to be most effective. It is designed for continuous learning, meaning it is constantly evolving with new missions rapidly added to address the latest threats in the oil and gas industry. Further, targeted training can be achieved from the library of mission scenarios to work on specific skill sets.

Training in cyber ranges is a great way to foster collaboration, accountability, and communication skills among your cyber team as well as cross-departmentally. Persistent and hands-on learning will help take your cyber team to the next level. Benefits of this kind of learning include:

  • Increased engagement – by keeping learners engaged they are able to stay focused on the subject matter at hand
  • Opportunities to close skills gaps immediately – instant feedback, instruction, and critique make it easy for learners to benefit from interaction with the instructor and peers and immediately implement this feedback to improve
  • Risk mitigation and improved problem-solving – hands-on training allows learners to master skills prior to working in real-world environments. People can work through tough scenarios in a safe training environment – developing problem-solving skills without risk.

By placing the power of security in human hands, cybersecurity teams can proactively improve a company’s ability to detect cyber-related security breaches or anomalous behavior, resulting in earlier detection and less impact of such incidence on energy delivery, thereby lowering overall business risk. Users are the last line of defense against threat actors so prioritizing gamified training for teams will foster the level of collaboration, transparency, and expertise needed to connect the dots for cybersecurity in oil and gas sectors.

This solution coupled with proper collaboration between IT and OT divisions to share real-time threat intelligence information will do wonders for companies looking to stay out of the negative news headlines and stay safe against an attack.

Download our Infographic “oil and gas cybersecurity” for more details on cyber readiness and training.

oil_gas_infographic

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Modernizing Cyber Ranges

Cyber ranges were initially developed for government entities looking to better train their workforce with new skills and techniques. Cyber ranges provide representations of actual networks, systems, and tools for novice and seasoned cyber professionals to safely train in virtual environments without compromising the safety and security of their own networks.

Today, cyber ranges are known to effectively train the cyber workforce across industries. As technology advances, ranges gain in their training scope and potential. The National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education reports cyber ranges provide:

  • Performance-based learning and assessment
  • A simulated environment where teams can work together to improve teamwork and team capabilities
  • Real-time feedback
  • Simulate on-the-job experience
  • An environment where new ideas can be tested and teams and work to solve complex cyber problems

In order to upskill cybersecurity professionals, commercial, academic, and government institutions have to gracefully fuse the technicalities of the field with the strategic thinking and problem-solving “soft skills” required to defeat sophisticated attacks. Cyber ranges can help do that.

Currently, cyber ranges come in two forms: Bare environments without pre-programmed content; or prescriptive content that may or may not be relevant to a user’s industry. Either form limits the learner’s ability to develop many skill sets, not just what their work role requires.

Six Components of Modern Cyber Ranges

Modern cyber ranges need realistic, industry-relevant content to help trainees practice offense and defense and governance activities in emulated networks. Further cyber ranges need to allow learners to use their own tools and emulated network traffic in order to expand the realism of the training exercise. By using tools in safe replicated networks, learners will have a better understanding of how to address a threat when the real-life scenario hits.

We also know that cybersecurity attacks require teams to combat them, not just one or two individuals. So, in addition to individual training, cyber ranges should also allow for team training and engagement for professionals to learn from one another and gain a bigger picture understanding of what it REALLY takes to stop evolving threats.

With advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI), we know cyber ranges can now support such technology. In the case of our own Project AresÒ, we are able to leverage AI and machine learning to gather user data and activity happening in the platform. As more users play Project Ares, patterns in the data reveal commonalities and anomalies of how missions are completed with minimal human intervention. Those patterns are used to inform the recommendations of an in-game advisor with “chat bot-esque” features available for users to contact if help is needed on a certain activity or level. Further, layering AI and machine learning gives cyber professionals better predictive capabilities and, according to Microsoft, even  “improve the efficacy of cybersecurity, the detection of hackers, and even prevent attacks before they occur.”

With many studies touting the benefits of gamification in learning, it only makes sense that modern ranges come equipped with a gamified element. Project Ares has a series of mini-games, battle rooms, and missions that help engage users in task completion—all while learning new techniques and strategies for defeating modern-day attacks. The mini-games help explain cyber technical and/or operational fundamentals with the goal of providing fun and instructional ways to learn a new concept or stay current on perishable skills. The battle rooms are environments used for training and assessing an individual on a set of specific tasks based on current offensive and defensive tactics, techniques and procedures. The missions are used for training and assessing an individual or team on their practical application of knowledge, skills and abilities in order to solve a given cybersecurity problem set, each with its own unique set of mission orders, rules of engagement and objectives.

There is a lot of sensitive data that can be housed in a cyber range so security is the final piece to comprising a modern cyber range. The cloud is quickly recognized as one of the most secure spaces to house network components (and physical infrastructure). To ensure the cyber ranges are operating quickly with the latest updates and to increase visibility of how users are engaging in the cyber ranges across the company, security in the cloud is the latest and greatest approach for users training in test environments.

There you have it. The next generation cyber range should have:

  • Industry-relevant content
  • Emulated network capabilities
  • Single and multi-player engagement
  • AI and machine learning
  • Gamification
  • Cloud-compatibility

We are proud to have pioneered such a next generation cyber range manifest in many of our platforms including (as mentioned above), Project Ares®, and CyRaaSTM. We hope this post helped you understand the true potential of cyber ranges and how they are evolving today to automate and augment the cyber workforce.

CISOs, Strengthen Your Cybersecurity Posture with These Resources

There is a hacker attack every 39 seconds. The average cost of a data breach in 2020 is expected to exceed $150 million. And by 2021, there will be more than 3.5 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs worldwide. No enterprise is safe from an attack.  

Because of that, CISOs realize as they evolve business operations to better serve customers, such progression has unintended security consequences and compromises. With strapped resources (both human and financial), how can CISOs in commercial sectors DO MORE to up their cybersecurity posture WITH LESS? The answer lies in the human-power to control systems, processes, and technologies.   

CISOs in every industry realize technologies and “one-and-done traditional training” cannot keep companies safe—but with the properly skilled individuals taking the reins to leverage those technologies optimally, the human-side of cybersecurity can minimize the skills gap and frequent attacks.  

Resource Roundup 

We’ve taken the liberty of publishing several articles to help CISOs “do more with less” to strengthen their cybersecurity posture. We understand you’ve spent lots of time and resources developing your teams. And they’re doing the best they can with the resources they have. Still, to amplify their success, ongoing training can help—and we hope these articles help, too.   

  1. Help wanted: Combatting the Cybersecurity Skills Shortage 
  2. Modernizing Cyber Ranges for Professional Learning 
  3. How to Tell if your Cyber Posture is Prone to an Attack
  4. Cybercrime Incidents in the Financial Services Sector 
  5. Why We Can’t Keep Ignoring Cyber Fatigue 
  6. How Continuous Learning Can Help Upskill Cyber Teams 
  7. Why Gamification is the Answer You’ve Been Looking For 
  8. The Benefits of Active Learning in Cyber Training  

Growing Cybersecurity Challenges  

CISOs and their teams are challenged to keep pace with evolving cyber threats due to staffing shortages, resource constraints, strategy misalignment. Not to mention the continuous threat of attacks on industries with interconnected technologies. In fact, 70% of cybersecurity professionals claim their organization is impacted by the skills shortage; With spending expected to exceed $1 trillion between 2017 and 2021 and 74% of C-suite executives failing to involve CISOs the leadership table, this makes the job of the CISO incredibly difficult. That is why Circadence is dedicated to helping CISOs DO MORE WITH LESS—because we understand the arduous uphill climb they face (and will continue to face) if something is not done.   

 

Hungry for more help? Download our 3 A’s INFOGRAPHIC to learn more ways to support your cyber team against imminent threats.

 

There’s Still Time to Up Your Cybersecurity Posture 

If cyber teams cannot upskill and keep pace with evolving threats, commercial sectors will continue to be hacked. Customers will not only lose trust in these institutions that aim to protect them and make their daily lives functional, but they simply won’t be able to operate efficiently, economies will suffer, and more.   

However, for enterprises that have experienced an attack, it’s not too late to invest in cyber training to prevent another. Doing nothing after an attack is the worst possible response. With failure comes opportunity to enhance resiliency on both a company-wide level, as well as at an employee-specific level. Investing in training tells hackers the attack attempt stops at its people first.  

For enterprises that have not experienced an attack, it’s not a matter of “if” but “when” it will occur. Digitalization and limited human resources make company’s front lines vulnerable and appealing to hackers. Now is the time to be proactive and empower cyber teams to train against hackers in a way that doesn’t require time-consuming travel, expenses, and other resources—simply a willingness to learn, grow, and upskill to better the company and themselves.   

Circadence wants to change how cyber professionals prepare for, protect, and defend against evolving cyber threats. We hope these, and future resources will help CISOs and cybersecurity leaders take proactive steps to strengthen their cybersecurity posture by training their teams and their entire organization, without the costly burden of traditional training courses.