Why Cyber Risk Mitigation is a Priority for Finance Leaders

The role of the CFO is evolving. Whether at a bank or credit union, today’s finance leaders wear many hats. One of which is a cyber security ‘hat’. Constant breaches within financial institutions warrant such a ‘wardrobe’. Insider threats are growing, outside adversaries are multiplying at rapid pace, and attacks on financial departments and companies are ever-increasing. Unfortunately, classic security controls like firewalls and antivirus are easily compromised as attackers become more sophisticated.

As threats increase, risks to businesses increase—and for CFOs and VPs of Finance, defining an adequate budget to account for those cyber risks and allocating proper resources is of the utmost importance to protect companies and its clients. Finance leaders are no longer siloed to reviewing financial statements and spreadsheets—their role extends far beyond the numbers to include cyber security.

Some CFOs may not be comfortable with this change but the reality of cyber security today mandates involvement from the CFO/VP of Finance to develop a cyber readiness strategy. Why are finance leaders critical to the cyber security conversation? Because many CFOs need to address and mitigate the business risk concerns of the C-suite , board , and investors (not to mention continuing to improve the ‘financial health’ of the company).

Any sort of digital compromise to a financial services company, results in damaging monetary and reputational outcomes that directly impact the financial function of the organization.

Hence why cyber risk mitigation is and should continue to be a critical priority for CFOs today. And for many, it already is: According to a 2019 study from Protiviti, 84% of global CFOs and VPs of Finance cited security and data privacy as a high priority[1] for them. Many CFOs are already taking the reins of the cyber security challenges to get ahead of looming risks and imminent vulnerabilities. How? By taking a more active role in defining cyber security strategy in a way that effectively hardens posture while ensuring company growth.

As such, the typical CFO responsibilities listed below, are only a part of many to come:

  1. identifying and monitoring risks of critical assets to protect company/client data
  2. ensuring critical infrastructure operations meet regulatory requirements
  3. contributing to the optimization of digital asset access and utilization to safeguard against attackers

That third responsibility may seem a tad ‘out of the norm’ for a CFO. Typically a CIO or CISO might be in charge of that objective. But as more financial services companies respond to digital transformation demands, data becomes a critical asset to protect. Much of that data “lives” on the devices that company employees use every day. CFOs should have a general awareness of who has access to what, where, and when and be aware of the policies in place that enforce security at all levels.

Since data is a valuable company asset, the CFO’s responsibility to ensure the financial ‘health’ of the company becomes much more complex as cyber security asset and risk management becomes a top priority. Security Boulevard writes “A modern CFO will have an excellent grasp on how an organization manages cyber security and will be able to ask the right questions.”[2] We agree!

For CFOs to make cyber security a priority, they are having to work across many lines of business within their organizations to contribute to the construction of a holistic cyber security program that has full buy-in from all employees (leadership/C-Suite included).

Learn how to prioritize risk mitigation in your financial services company.

Further, CFOs bring a unique perspective to the ‘building a culture of cyber security’ conversations as they are extremely committed to helping the company grow. While CFOs may not be cyber security experts, they do have a unique take on how and what solutions to invest in that will maximize the potential for company growth over time.

By working hand-in-hand across departments like IT and legal, CFOs and finance leaders can develop a holistic cyber security plan that goes beyond merely ‘evaluating cyber insurance coverage’. A huge part of strategic cyber planning includes understanding what current companies are doing to mitigate cyber risk. Foundational elements need to be established first.

While cyber insurance is a good start, other measures need to be taken to ensure that companies are not just reacting when threats occur, but instead, are taking proactive measures to get ahead of threats before they hit. A proactive approach should also include the adoption of a persistent cyber security training program to support frontline defenders who are doing the day-to-day defense against ambitious yet malicious adversaries.

With the right cyber security training in place, teams can be assessed on their abilities to identify and mitigate risks before they happen, while supervisors (e.g. CISOs) can glean insight into how teams are responding and areas for improvement. This intel can translate upward to the CFO who will need to know the risks associated with gaps in cyber security response.

 

Check out our webinar:
Great Dance Partners: How Cyber Security and Risk Mitigation Go Hand-in-Hand.

[1] https://www.cfodive.com/news/cybersecurity-is-latest-cfo-domain-study-finds/567056/

[2] https://securityboulevard.com/2019/08/is-it-critical-for-cfos-to-understand-cybersecurity-2/

Photo by Carlos Muza on Unsplash

Gamification for the Greater Good: Why We Need More Diverse Learning Approaches for the Workforce

“Gamification” is a term that has been popularized by the modern cultural and consumer demand of video games. It is the application of design elements (e.g. leaderboards, scoring, points) to an activity or set of activities, made popular by video games. Today, it has made its way into software programs as a way to increase engagement and productivity. Yet when we think about gamification today, we don’t generally think of its application in educational settings, let alone in the business world. After all, when was the last time Ubisoft had a press conference about how gamified Assassin’s Creed is? So what are we talking about? We’re talking about the challenge of engaging adults in professional training and development while being sensitive to their learning preferences. The reality is, it’s hard to get adult learners excited to go back to the classroom to learn something for their job. But there exists a potential for gamification to lower the barriers to learning for adults. Today’s professionals are a prime target for using gamification in a more meaningful way—to break through the “sheer fun and games” if you will, and leverage gamified elements for a greater, more significant purpose. Gamification is really all about education, and it’s alleviating the age-old struggle of how to teach effectively and remain relevant.

Before breaking down the benefits of gamification in learning, let’s review more common learning approaches. Less thrilling “cousins” of gamification often used in teaching and tasked-based activities include displays like tutorials, lectures, slide shows, watch-only videos, and text-based material. These are used in educational settings and are part of what researchers define as “passive learning,” techniques—a method of teaching where students receive information from a source to internalize and regurgitate. Studies show this approach is highly ineffective at helping learners retain information (and even worse when it comes to applying learned information to an actual experience or task). Gamification can help overcome these challenges—especially when we leverage it within the context of business training and professional employee development. The types of training professionals might undergo include trainings on customer engagement and retention, sales processes, use of specific software applications, etc. If professionals can conduct those trainings in gamified settings, their propensity for completing (and enjoying!) training increases. We’ll discuss “how” this actually happens later. As a result, they might be better collaborators among colleagues, drive more sales, or foster greater customer satisfaction.

Entertainment with a Social Benefit

We’re constantly on the hunt for the “perfect” way to teach, one that resonates and is impactful. The difficulty here is that people are unique, each with their own motivations, modes of learning, and literally the way our brains are wired to absorb information. Gamification isn’t the first attempt at a perfect solution, television and radio had their time as well. Before we dive deeper into how gamification enables professional, adult learning, let’s understand how history has taught communities.

Before video games entered the market in a big way, TV and radio held the spotlight as primary modes by which information was relayed and stories were told. What you might not know is that the channel’s reputation to deliver information to the masses (eventually ‘to entertain’ the masses) was actually grounded in socio-psychological theory. Miguel Sabido aptly named the “Sabido methodology” to define ways in which social attitudes and behaviors were positively changed due to information (aka: a stimulus) delivered from television and radio. Sabido pioneered the use of telenovelas to teach about social issues in the 1970s and 80s, when he was Vice President of Research at the Mexican television network Televisa.

His complex narratives allowed audiences to relate to his characters who were often positioned as positive, negative, and neutral role models. The characters addressed relevant social issues of the times (e.g. women’s status, child slavery, environmental protection, HIV/AIDS) and audiences became emotionally attached to them as they made good or bad decisions within the storyline. Why? Because the topics covered and the character behaviors resonated with viewers.

What Sabido uncovered in this narrative communication method (complete with relatable characters and compelling storyline) was a new way to teach people about important issues they otherwise might not care to educate themselves on. Over the next decade, Sabido produced six serial dramas that touched on issues of HIV/AIDS and safe sex practices—coincidentally (or not), Mexico experienced a 34% decline in population growth rate during that same time frame. Perhaps the way in which he addressed social issues that were important to his viewers, resonated after all.

We can learn a lot from Sabido’s efforts here. According to Population Media, “The major tenet of the Sabido methodology is that education can be compelling and that entertainment can be educational. Sabido originally termed his approach ‘entertainment with proven social benefit,’ and since then, many communication professionals and scholars have applied the term ‘entertainment-education’ to the Sabido approach.” Sabido helped pioneer a new kind of learning that adults were attracted to and interestingly enough, we see similar “entertaining education” strides made today when teaching is done using gamification.

Learning Styles, Information Overload, and Misconceptions of Gamification

It’s not shocking that the interactive media and gaming industry has followed this “entertainment-education” pathway. As technology evolves, we naturally find new ways of putting it to work for us in a way that is not only useful and functional but appealing. Sabido’s use of serialized dramas and engaging characters have shown to be extremely effective in igniting social change and shifting social attitudes among viewers/consumers of information—and as professionals in business, we should learn from his work and mission. Consider gamification the latest teaching approach we have at our fingertips. It offers a new way of learning that hasn’t been employed to its fullest potential in other media/education models.

There are three generally recognized learning styles: Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic. Kinesthetic learning (learning by doing), wasn’t really an option for Sabido (watching TV was passive information consumption, visual and auditory). However, gamification and interactive media is a reflection of that third learning category, kinesthetic. For the first time, we can take a student to Mars in a virtual environment, or have them interact with a neuron the size of a house leveraging Kinesthetic learning technology. The training and educational possibilities are endless (especially when we layer in elements of gamification) and we’re just scratching the surface.

But learning is only as effective as the approach we deploy to learn. When it comes to assessing the effectiveness of gamification in an educational application, learners tend to evaluate it from two lenses, asking: “How do I learn” and “How do I play?” To answer these questions, we can review various game mechanics and features that make up each of the three learning styles. More on that later. However, we’re missing a large piece of the purpose of gamification if we don’t also ask “Why do I play?” This is equally the most challenging question to answer when it comes to using gamification to teach today’s professionals.

If we are to truly leverage gamification as a learning mechanism for business in professional training and development, we first need to understand how adults process new information. Researchers note “…our problem as adults are that we want to take new knowledge and compare and contrast it to what we already have. Our brains natively know that they can only process so much at a time, so they try to analyze incoming input to identify key material that must be retained, and then immediately file that information alongside relevant contexts. That processing imposes a significant amount of overhead, and it’s why acquiring new knowledge and skills is so much harder for an adult.”

Compare that learning style against the physical act of teaching a child, and we see stark differences. When teaching a child a concept, it is relatively straightforward: preach at them, and they’ll absorb it. For the most part, author Don Jones notes, “they’ll believe it because they tend to lack the context to dispute it.”

Now apply how adults learn to their professional and personal environments. As adults, we’re constantly bombarded, now more than ever, with new information at every moment. Opening up your phone in the morning usually bears forth a host of notifications to sift through, between messages, news headlines, and advertisements. Our brains are constantly working to filter what we care about, and what we don’t. Adults do this natively and unintentionally, as much as we’d like to just absorb all the information we’re presented with… our brains just don’t function that way anymore. We’d be on overload!

Should businesses adopt gamification as a learning strategy to enable professionals in their day-to-day jobs, we must first be cognizant of their perception of “playing a game,” (especially now that we understand how they learn and filter information). Imagine an adult that’s being asked to learn something new on the job by using a gamified platform where they have to play a “video game” to do it. That adult learner may very well bemoan the thought of “going back to school” or “playing a game” to learn something about their job. Unfortunately, video games aren’t something adults take seriously (because up until recently, they haven’t been really applied to support business-like functions and serve a greater good). There’s a perception that playing games is all fun and not meaningful–but gamification has to overcome these misconceptions. When teaching adults, we must remember to communicate the “why”…

Jones also notes, “I often provide the ‘why do I care about this?’ answer upfront, in the form of a problem statement, where my key point becomes the solution. I then immediately illustrate or demonstrate how the key point solves the problem, providing reinforcement and confirmation to the students’ brains.”

Leaders interested in deploying gamified learning in professional training programs need to communicate the “Why do I play?” to their trainees. The answer isn’t merely to ensure the learner understands the point of the lesson, it’s much more about understanding what drives and engages their brain to interact with a gamified environment in the first place. There are driving motivational factors in gamification that make it a powerful tool for professional training and learning. Given that we all are wired differently, we must understand how to make gamification work best for us, as individual learners.

Making Gamification Work for All Learners

Yu-kai Chou created a framework for gamification and behavioral analysis that he calls “The Octalysis Gamification Framework.” Within he does a fantastic job breaking down driving factors and motivators for different types of gamers and learners—and we can use this model as a foundation to build out professional learning programs and activities in our own businesses. The Octalysis Framework is extremely deep, yet it’s easier to understand Chou’s eight Core Drivers in human behavior, in the circular graph.

When we consider Chou’s driving factors, through the lens of “How we Learn” and “How we Play,” in-game mechanics—with the understanding of the three learning styles, it becomes easier to see the potential for gamification as a mechanism to complement other learning styles. By examining the motivating factors that contribute to whether or not something is considered “gamified,” those doing the teaching can clearly see where kinesthetic learning fits within the overall game mechanics structure in relation to auditory/visual representations found in the mechanics.

Figure 2

Notice in figure 2, game mechanics prioritize competitive drivers over collaborative efforts, community over exploration (as indicated by the quantity of learning style icons).

As much as we celebrate the experiential elements of kinesthetic learning in educational literature… there’s much work to be done in gamification to ensure hands-on learning styles are better represented on this model so that more inclusive learning can be had.

Further, game components like “Levels” and “Missions” are incredibly broad terms and they can be as varied as the subjects they attempt to illustrate, yet I would argue that these mechanics determine if a product truly feels like a game more than features like the ability to share accomplishments socially or obtaining a badge.

The reality is, we’ve had a much longer history teaching to auditory and visual learning pillars, more so than teaching and training staff with gamification. If anything, this may illustrate that it’s easier to develop products and software that align with the visual and auditory-based learners versus developing products to meet the needs of those who want more hands-on experiences in a game-like setting. This is why we mostly hear about digital badging, leaderboards, and “leveling up” in the context of video games instead of in training programs for business professionals.

While incorporating gamification elements into a professional development training program can be done, do we need to check off all these game mechanic boxes in order for a product to be considered “Gamified?” Arguably no. It’s all about your demographics and what will drive them to learn most effectively.

We have reflected upon the history of “engaging educational learning” in the context of telenovela programming, deepened our understanding how we process and retain learned material in an overly interconnected culture, and sought new ways for learning to “stick,” one thing becomes clear: gamification is an untapped learning resource for today’s professionals. Dare I say, the diamond in the rough we’ve been searching for in business training and professional development. If your professional demographic is at all varied (I bet it is), then your teaching strategies will likely have to be as well. It’s time businesses think beyond the passive learning styles of yesteryear, and embrace a new gamified approach to adult training and development—something that better fosters driving factors like collaboration and exploration equally to that of competition, community, and achievement. Only then, will we really have a learning approach that meets everyone where they are.

Things to do at RSA 2020 

This year’s RSA Conference is sure to be chockfull of exciting innovations, new technology, and swag galore. As much as we love the excitement of being on the expo floor, it’s always a good idea to take time to explore the conference, meet new people, and unwind with a few good colleagues or newfound friendsThis list of networking gatherings and affiliate events will help you make the most out of your RSA experience! 

 

Events through RSA: 

  • 2/25 6:00 pm to 8:00 pmCyBeer Ops Networking Reception – Craft beer tasting event that doubles as a great networking opportunity.
     
  • 2/27 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm: RSAC After Hours – Enjoy food, drinks, and dancing to a live 80’s cover band.
     
  • 2/25 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm: RSAC Women’s Networking Reception – Relaxed networking event celebrating women’s contributions to science and technology.
     
  • 2/24 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm: Welcome Reception – Kick off the conference with drinks and apps while previewing cyber solutions from over 700 exhibitors.
     
  • Multiple dates and times, registration required: RSAC Engagement Zone – Engage, network, and make personal connections with others who share your interests through Braindate, Birds of a Feather, Cooperative Learning roundtables, and more.
     
  • Multiple dates and times: RSAC Sandbox – Show off your cyber skills through hands-on experiences and mingle with peers at this engaging event.
     
  • 2/26 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm: Expo Pub Crawl – Enjoy complimentary beer, wine, and non-alcoholic beverages while visiting sponsor’s booths and learning about their latest innovations to support your business. 

 

Affiliate events: 

  • 2/24 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm: CYBERTACOS at RSAC – Talk over tacos with members of the local cybersecurity and broader IT community.
     
  • 2/24 7:00pm to 10:00 pm: Ignite – With live music, snacks, cocktails, and dancing, this is THE place to be Monday night.
     
  • 2/25 5:00 pm to 9:00 pmOptiv After Party – Thirsty Bear Organic Brewing Company will have great beer on tap while you network the night away. 
  • 2/25 6:00 pm, registration requiredVMware Carbon Black Networking Reception – This exclusive happy hour at the W San Francisco is sure to be the event you need to kick off your RSA experience just right. Register now as space is limited.
     
  • 2/25 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm: Non-Profits on the Loose – Meet and mingle with industry, policy, and government leaders in security and privacy at this soirée.
     
  • 2/26 11:30 am to 1:00 pm: Meet & Greet at RSA Conference 2020  Join the Executive Women’s Forum and meet the most amazing women at the RSA Conference.
     
  • 2/26 5:30 pm to 8:30 pmICMP Networking Social RSA 2020  – Network with members, friends, and guests of the International Consortium of Minority Cybersecurity Professionals.
     
  • 2/26 6:30 pm to 9:30 pmArctic Wolf Happy Hour – Sips and savors at TRES Tequila Lounge and Mexican Kitchen is the perfect mid-week way to unwind.
     

Stay up to date on any additional affiliate events as they get added by checking out this calendar provided by the conference, and be sure to swing by our booth #6480 to see what we’ve been working on and add to your swag collection

To get a sneak peek at our latest cyber training platform, inCyt and be sure to register for our webinar, inCyt: Inside the Human Element of Cyber. We can’t wait to see you at the conference and have some fun! 

Living Our Mission Blog Series:Early Aspirations in Technology Become a Reality for Circadence’s Paul Ellis

Early Aspirations in Technology Become Reality for Circadence’s Paul Ellis 

Paul Ellis, Senior Product Manager at Circadence, was always interested in technology, even at a young age. When Paul was 8-years oldhe rode his bike to the closest RadioShack to buy a book written for adults on the topic of electrical engineering no lessAfter saving enough allowance to purchase the book, he dove into it as soon as he got home and that’s where his love for technology really began. 

But perhaps, too, Paul’s passion stemmed from his father, who worked for a company developing computer robots. Their bond over technology contributed to Paul’s interest in the field. In factPaul and his father built their first computer together – an 8Mhz Intel 8088 PC when he was 10 years old. Paul read the entire instruction manual from front to back to learn what he could do with his newly built device. From that day on, he was always creating! He created electronic devices, computers, and even composed music. 

In high school Paul played many different instruments and began his college journey with aspirations to become a sound engineer to satisfy his interest for both technology and music. He quickly realized that his interest in technology outweighed his musical career interest, and that the lifestyle of a sound engineer wasn’t very appealing. 

He changed his major to Business and Marketing and graduated with a Bachelor of Science from California State University San Marcos in 2005. He then continued to Purdue University for an MBA in Technology Commercialization, Marketing and Finance. Throughout his academic journey and in his free time he continued to create and assemble tech devices. He was never afraid of technology; he was drawn to it and always knew there was a way to control it. 

Paul, a techie through and through, followed his cyber heart and became a Senior Product Manager for more than a decade for various leading tech firms. He began to learn about identity risk and how our technological advancements were increasing threats. During his time at a previous employer, LifeLock, he learned about risk prevention, identity theft, how vulnerable consumers are in the real worldand how risk would continue to escalate if companies and individuals weren’t taking precautions to protect themselves and their devices.  

Upon joining Circadence, Paul began to navigate the world of cybersecurityThe company’s cutting-edge ideas and technology designed to protect businesses, government and consumers were appealing to him given what he had observed in previous tech positions. He was interested in the innovative products that provided new ways for cybersecurity beginners and professionals to learn, and he could envision how it would improve the cyber posture of enterprises. 

“I feel like I’m doing something positive for society,” Paul said. He’s been with Circadence for a year now as the Senior Product Manager and continues to be inspired by his team and the revolutionary products Circadence brings to market.  

“There’s a huge threat out there, and a huge lack of skills in the industry, and being a part of the solution is a big part of my intrinsic motivation.”  

Paul enjoys partaking in all the different facets of a product’s lifecycle – how the product supports a need for the consumer or industry, how it is marketed, and how to assess its financial viabilityHe also enjoys talking to customers to learn about their experience with a product first-hand, because at the end of the day, a product’s success is dependent upon customer’s experience with it 

Managing the success of a product is how he gauges the success of his career – what did the product solve, and how did it benefit the customer and the industry? The payoff is seeing the cumulative effect of the entire product,” said Paul. For example, iNovember 2019 he worked long hours along-side his team to prepare for one of our largest partner events – Microsoft Ignite. They developed specific gamified battle rooms in Project Ares to teach user’s about Microsoft’s new security tools and how they can be utilized in realistic cyber scenarios. Attendees could get direct experience using Microsoft’s security tools within Project Ares, which runs on Microsoft Azure 

“Ignite was one of the most meaningful moments in my career and I’m fortunate I had the opportunity to work with my team to pull it off! There was so much teamwork, collaboration and problem solving from planning, developing, to deployment at the event. It’s only in bringing people together, that my work succeeds.”  

Paul not only enjoys doing something that keeps consumers and businesses safer, but he truly respects and values his team at Circadence. There’s a true sense of trust between everyone on his team and he feels fortunate to have this experience in the workplace.  

The need for improved cybersecurity is everywhere,” said Paul. The cyber learning products Circadence provides today will help teach the future cyber workforce and help protect us from the countless risks and threats that are out there. He continues to fulfill his passion for technology by bringing Circadence cyber learning products to marketHe appreciates Circadence products because they actually provide trainees what they need to knowand what they will be doing on a day-to-day basis. It’s not just about reading a white paper or watching a video – gamified platforms like Project Ares provide hands-on experience to master the craft of cybersecurity. 

Photo by Alexandre Debiève on Unsplash

Photo by Marvin Meyer on Unsplash

Living Our Mission: Building a Roadmap to Bring Product Vision to Reality with Circadence’s Raj Kutty

This installment of the “Living our Mission” blog series features Circadence’s Rajani “Raj” Kutty, Senior Product Manager.  

Raj is fascinated by technology’s evolution in the marketplace and that interest has informed her career path toward success. She achieved her masters degree in computer science from University of Pennsylvania in 2003. From there, she spent 15-16 years in the tech industry and has always been interested in the everchanging advancements in technology. Her tech background consists of Java programming, business analysis and product management. In the beginning of her career, she worked on mobile app designs, web app development, and programming for various industries including finance, insurance, retail, and more. For the last 10 years, she’s moved into the direction of product management. Her shift into this area began because she enjoys building a roadmap for product development and seeing it through the various stages from identifying a problem in the market, and creating a product that solves pain points for customers. Her experience working with many different industries provides an advantage to Circadence since she has a first-hand understanding of why these businesses can benefit from additional cyber security training to protect company assets.

Raj started at Circadence about 7 months ago and was immediately captivated by the concept of cyber readiness and the security industry as a whole. Throughout her profession, she noticed a growing issue many companies faced: a lack of cyber security awareness and training. Over the years, she heard a lot about the cyber workforce shortage and knew the first step to creating a solution for this problem was to get the user engaged with the right type of training. In her mind, if the user is engaged in training, then it would result in better cyber defense for the organization. Her previous work experience, thoughts about cyber security readiness and ideas around engaged training were validated when she heard what Circadence was doing to help companies be “cyber ready” using gamified learning platforms. In the past, training would consist of a video, classroom lecture or reading textbooks- something dry and boring, she said. Raj felt Circadence offered a unique solution to get people interested in cyber security, which could lead to more strategic cyber defense performance and possibly minimize the cyber workforce gap.

“Training has to be fun and interesting to the user, while still being effective. I feel like Circadence is offering this to the cyber workforce in a game-play mode, which is more engaging for the user.”

Day to day, Raj works with different departments and team members at Circadence developing product strategy and bringing a product roadmap to life. Her knowledge across many industries helps ensure our products meet the needs of different organizations, while still maintaining in-depth cyber training and ease-of-use for the customer. Much like planning a road trip, which requires knowledge of route to destination, Raj leads her team every day by investigating and communicating strategy and plans to determine where they need to go next to bring the product to market.

Her main focus over the last couple months has been a new portal Circadence is developing called CyberBridge. CyberBridge is the entry point at which users can access all Circadence cyber learning platforms including Project Ares®, inCyt®, Orion® and more. It’s a global SaaS platform that offers different types of cyber training content for different markets.

“I love that I get to help design a product that addresses the cyber challenges across different industries and the ability to provide a readiness solution pertinent to each sector’s security pain points.”

The products Raj helps map to market fulfills her goal of bringing much-needed cyber awareness and training solutions to everyone and every business. Her perspective: With every tech integration, Bluetooth connection, and device-to-device communication we implement to make our working lives easier, we inherently increase our cyber risk as our attack surface widens. There are no signs of a slowing tech usage, hence why the importance of cyber awareness continues to grow each day. When we talk about how businesses need to protect themselves, we’re really talking about the people of a business, since people are what make up a company. In today’s world of escalating cyber threats, it’s everyone’s responsibly to gain cyber awareness to protect a company.

“Cybersecurity is like community immunity, when everyone gets vaccinated, we are improving and protecting our greater community, and cyber security works the same way.”

Photo by John Lockwood on Unsplash

Photo by Bogdan Karlenko on Unsplash

New Year, New Threats: Top Cyber Threats Anticipated to Hit Big in 2020 for Enterprise Companies

As we enter the New Year, one thing is certain: cyber attacks aren’t going anywhere. Enterprise companies have been tasked with defending their networks from unyielding cyber crooks who want a piece of the pie for themselves. What’s on the horizon for enterprise security threats in 2020? We’ve got a few predictions.

  • DeepFakes

    Deep Fake technology can create fake but incredibly realistic images, text, and videos. Computers can rapidly process numerous facial biometrics, and mathematically build or classify human features, to mimic a person or group of individuals for public manipulation. Bloomberg reports the tech is becoming so sophisticated, detecting a DeepFake video from a real one, is getting harder and harder to differentiate for viewers.

    While the technical benefits are impressive, underlying flaws inherent in all types of Deep Fake models represent a rapidly growing security weakness, which cyber criminals will exploit. It will be critical for businesses to understand the security risks presented by facial recognition and other biometric systems and educate themselves on the risks as well as hardening systems that require/use facial recognition.

  • API and Cloud vulnerabilities 

    An application programming interface (API) is an interface or communication protocol between different parts of a computer program intended to simplify the implementation and maintenance of software. APIs are an essential tool in cloud environments, acting as a service gateway to enable direct and indirect cloud software and infrastructure services to cloud users.

    A recent study showed more than three in four organizations treat API security differently than web app security, indicating API security readiness lags behind other aspects of application security. The study also reported that more than two-thirds of organizations expose APIs to the public to enable partners and external developers to tap into their software platforms and app ecosystems. Threat actors are following the growing number of organizations using API-enabled apps because APIs continue to be an easy – and vulnerable – means to access a treasure trove of sensitive data. Despite the fallout of large-scale breaches and ongoing threats, APIs often still reside outside of the application security infrastructure and are ignored by security processes and teams.

  • 5G Threats

    With the rollout of 5G continuing in 2020, we will see an increase in the volume and speed of data theft. The AT&T Cybersecurity Insights Report: Security at the Speed of 5G, shows that larger enterprises are not prepared for the security implications of 5G. The top cyber security concerns that came back in this report were:

  • Larger attack surface due to the massive increase in connectivity
  • Greater number of devices accessing the network
  • The extension of security policies
  • Authentication of a larger number and wider variety of devices.

As more 5G devices enter the network, organizations must prepare for the onslaught of added security threats.

  • Ransomware attacks evolve

    Ah, ransomware, seemingly every hacker’s favorite extortion tool. According to McAfee Labs 2020 Threat Prediction Report, the increase of targeted ransomware has created a growing demand for compromised company networks. This demand is met by criminals who specialize in penetrating company networks and sell complete network access in one go.

“I expect that the ransomware used will continue to become more advanced. I am concerned that some threats have just become more stealthy, or are working toward that, and that readily available ransomware will enable even novice criminals to maintain stealth. Organizations are spending more resources to defend against ransomware, which might drive out a few of the lesser players, but any organization with resources will still see ransomware attacks happen as a fast and easy way for financial gain, so hackers will continue to pursue advancements.” ~ Karl Gosset, VP of Content Development at Circadence

It’s clear that the threat landscape will continue to grow and become more sophisticated in the coming year, which means it’s time for businesses to step up their security game.

Circadence believes that the best way to do this is through cyber learning games themselves! Our flagship product, Project Ares, delivers real-world attack scenarios in a safe, online range environment and allows users to practice and hone their cyber skills through the use of games. With missions specific to enterprise threats, such as Operation Crimson Wolf and Operation Desert Whale, Project Ares will ready your organization for any looming threats like these. By using a gamified cyber learning platform like this for your security teams in 2020, you can readily pop some champagne and dance the night away, knowing your enterprise is better protected in the new year.

Photo by Robynne Hu on Unsplash

Photo by Bud Helisson on Unsplash

Living our Mission: Project Ares Takes Full Flight with Cloud-Native Architecture

According to CIO magazine, about 96% of organizations use cloud services in one way or another. In partnership with Microsoft, we are proud to announce that Circadence has redesigned its Project Ares cyber learning platform to fully leverage a cloud-native design on Microsoft Azure.  This new, flexible architecture improves cyber training to be even more customized, scalable, accessible, and relevant for today’s professionals.

This transition to cloud infrastructure will yield immediate impacts to our current customers.

  • Increased speeds to launch cyber learning battle rooms and missions
  • Greater ability to onboard more trainees to the system from virtually any location
  • More access to cyber training content that suits their security needs and professional development interests

Proven success at Microsoft Ignite

At the recent Microsoft Ignite conference (November 2019), more than 500 security professionals had the opportunity to use the enhanced platform.  Conference participants set up CyberBridge accounts and then played customized battle rooms in Project Ares. Microsoft cloud-based Azure security solutions were integrated into the cloud-based cyber range to provide an immersive “cloud-in-cloud” sandboxed learning experience that realistically aligned to phases of a ransomware attack.  The new version of Project Ares sustained weeklong intensive usage while delivering on performance. 

So what’s new in the new and improved Project Ares?

Curriculum Access Controls for Tailored Cyber Learning

One of the biggest enhancements for Project Ares clients is that they can now control permissions for  training exercises and solution access at the user level. Customer Administrators will use the new CyberBridge management portal to tailor access to Circadence training exercises for individual users or groups of users.

Single-sign-on through CyberBridge enables the alignment of training exercises to individuals based on their unique learning requirements including:

  • Cyber skill-building exercises and complex missions within Project Ares for cyber professionals
  • Cyber foundation learning with Cyber Essentials tools for the IT team
  • Security awareness training with inCyt for general staff

Cyber Essential learning tools and the inCyt game for security awareness will be added to CyberBridge over the next several months. With the capability to pre-select training activities reflective of a company’s overall security strategy, enterprise security managers can call the shots.

“As the administrator, you now choose what curriculum content your team should have. “This provides more flexibility in cyber training for our customers in terms of what they can expose to their teams.” ~ Rajani Kutty, Senior Product Manager for CyberBridge at Circadence.

Greater Scalability and Performance in Cyber Training

With a cloud-native architecture design, Project Ares can support more simultaneous users on the platform than ever before. Project Ares can now handle over 1,000 concurrent users, a significant improvement over historical capacity of 200-250 concurrent users on the platform.  The combination of  content access control at the group or individual level and the increased scalability of Project Ares creates a solution that effectively spins up cyber ranges with built-in learning exercises for teams and enterprises of any size.  Additionally, this means that no matter where a cyber learner is geographically, they can log on to Project Ares and access training quickly. We see this as similar to the scalability and accessibility of any large global content provider (e.g. Netflix)—in that users who have accounts can log in virtually anywhere in the world at multiple times and access their accounts.

Now that Project Ares can support a greater volume of users on the platform, activities like hosting cyber competitions and events for experts and aspiring security professionals can be done on-demand and at scale.

“We can train more people in cyber than ever before and that is so impactful when we remember the industry’s challenges in workforce gaps and skills deficiencies.” ~ Paul Ellis, Project Ares Senior Product Manager at Circadence

The previous design of Project Ares required placing users in “enclaves” or groups when they signed on to the system to ensure the content within could be loaded quickly without delay. Now, everyone can sign in at any time and have access to learning without loading delays. It doesn’t even matter if multiple people are accessing the same mission or battle room at the same time. Their individual experience loading and playing the exercise won’t be compromised because of increased user activity.

Other performance improvements made to this version of Project Ares include:

  • Quicker download speeds of cyber exercises
  • Use of less memory on user’s computers, and resulting longer battery life for users, thanks to lower CPU utilization.
  • These behind-the-scenes improvements mean that training can happen quicker and learning, faster.

New Cyber Training Content

One new Mission and three new Battle Rooms will be deployed throughout the next few months on this new version of Project Ares.

  • Mission 15, Operation Raging Mammoth, showcases how to protect against an Election attack
  • Battle Rooms 19 and 20 feature Splunk Enterprise installation, configuration, and fundamentals
  • Battle Room 21 teaches Powershell cmdlet (pronounced command-lets) basics

Mission 15 has been developed from many discussions about 2020 election security given past reports of Russian hacktivist groups interfering with the 2016 U.S. election.  In Operation Raging Mammoth, users are tasked to monitor voting-related systems. In order to identify anomalies, players must first establish a baseline of normal activity and configurations. Any changes to administrator access or attempt to modify voter registration information must be quickly detected and reported to authorities. Like all Project Ares Missions, the exercise aligns with NIST/NICE work roles, specifically Cyber Defense Analyst, Cyber Defense Incident Responder, Threat/Warning analyst.

Battle Rooms 19 and 20 focuses on using Splunk software to assist IT and security teams to get the most out of their security tools by enabling log aggregation of event data from across an environment into a single repository of critical security insights. Teaching cyber pros how to configure and use this tool helps them identify issues faster so they can resolve them more efficiently to stop threats and attacks.

Battle Room 21 teaches cmdlet lightweight commands used in PowerShell.  PowerShell is a command-line (CLI) scripting language developed by Microsoft to simplify automation and configuration management, consisting of a command-line shell and associated scripting language. With PowerShell, network analysts can obtain all the information they need to solve problems they detect in an environment. Microsoft notes that PowerShell also makes learning other programming languages like C# easier.

Embracing Cloud Capabilities for Continual Cyber Training

Circadence embraces all the capabilities the cloud provides and is pleased to launch the latest version of Project Ares that furthers our vision to provide sustainable, scalable, adaptable cyber training and learning opportunities to professionals so they can combat evolving threats in their workplace and in their personal lives.

As this upward trend in cloud utilization becomes ever-more prevalent, security teams of all sizes need to adapt their strategies to acknowledge the adoption of the cloud and train persistently in Project Ares. You can bet that as more people convene in the cloud, malicious hackers are not far behind them, looking for ways to exploit it. By continually innovating in Project Ares, we hope professionals all over the globe can better manage their networks in the cloud and protect them from attackers.

Living Our Mission Blog Series: Cyber Security + Teaching = the Perfect Match for Developing Cyber Curriculum in Project Ares for Circadence’s Megan Daudelin 

Ever wondered about the people behind Project Ares’ development? How does Circadence identify and develop learning curriculum material to benefit today’s cyber professionals? The crux of the strategy stems from the talents within our own Circadence family and is the driving force behind this “Living our Mission” article. We are sharing the unique talents of Megan Daudelin, Team Lead of Curriculum Development for our flagship gamified learning platform, Project Ares. While one might expect that a cyber background is critical to any tech-focused role in a security company, Megan would argue that having a strong understanding of learning theories, experience teaching cyber subjects, and placing oneself in the customer’s shoes equally weigh in importance to successfully build rich cyber curriculum into our products.  

 Blending Forensics, Hospital Security, and Cyber Education   

Megan has a rich history in the cyber security industrywhich started after she graduated with her bachelor’s degree, and continued as she worked full time while completing her Master’s in Digital Forensics Management from Champlain CollegePrior to Circadence, she served as a Digital Forensic Analyst at ManTech and Information Security Content Analyst at Tenable Network Security. She also worked as a Network Security Analyst at New London Hospital between her stints at ManTech and Tenable, monitoring networks and medical devices in accordance with HIPPA. Those experiences helped her learn the importance of understanding an end-user’s behavior to identify and investigate digital evidence.  

 Her career as a digital forensic analyst revolved around gathering and interpreting data. She recalls a previous job where she was responsible for writing up a narrative around a customer by referencing only the information available in a customer’s device. She would get a sense of the day-to-day digital life the user led to understand who and how that person was using the technology.  

“That’s the part I liked, taking a vast amount of information and drawing the lines through the ‘dust cloud’ of data to figure out the connections between everything and turn the ‘cloud’ into a digestible amount of information.  

 As Megan embraced new skill acquisition on the job, she grew to appreciate how problem-solving played a critical role in managing threats for her employers and their customers. 

It was her passion for identifying the tools and techniques that best helped harden security posture that led her back to the classroom as an Adjunct Professor at her alma mater, Champlain College, to help groom the next generation of cyber professionals. Her professional experience across multiple disciplines in cyber, from digital forensics to network security to ethical hacking and incident response, allows her to teach courses on a variety of cybersecurity disciplines—a job she still does today.  

 Using Teaching to Inform Cyber Learning in Project Ares 

Over the last two years, Megan has taken her love for teaching and applied it directly to the innovation within Project Ares. She is able to see how her students learn best whether through direct, hands-on experiences or learning from peersand she applies those observations within a customer’s experience in the platform. All of this comes with the understanding that she must remember not to get “too deep” into one thought pattern, to maintain the “10,000 foot view” as she puts it, so that she can build cyber learning curriculum that is cross-disciplinary and cross-functional.  

 Megan put her cyber and teaching skills to the ultimate test at the Microsoft Ignite “Into the Breach” cyber defense experience in November 2019. She helped design six custom-built Battle Rooms in Project Ares that were used in a competition-style activity among event registrants.  The battle rooms provided a gamified learning approach to teach cyber professionals about Microsoft Security Tools. Megan used the Project Ares virtual environments to create hands-on, experiential learning activity that focused on problem-solving using Microsoft tools. By adopting the end-user’s perspectiveshe was able to help the players through the maze from the home page of the Project Ares interface down to the data they were looking for to find the answers they needed.  

“It was quite the adventure learning all these new security solutions and organizing them into a cohesive storylineWe weren’t asking independent questions to teach TTPs in a silo. Instead, we were walking the players through a single attack pattern. The narrative was knit together so that they could understanthat the tasks in the Battle Rooms were related to the progressive arc of a full-scope attack and there were different points along the kill chain where the Microsoft tools could help to identify, analyze, and respond.” 

Looking ahead…  

As Megan works hard to build learning curriculum into Project Ares, she can’t help but think about what lies ahead for the cyber security industry.  

 “I hope the prioritization of training and education continues to increase; I hope the prioritization of security as a pillar of someone’s organization continues to get recognition. I think we’re coming out of a phase where organizations felt that they could just ignore the elephant that’s stomping around their data center.  

 I’m hopeful we’re moving into a time that people are becoming more aware of their organization’s digital activity online…. not just in a check-the-box periodic program kind of way, but in the sense that cyber security readiness and training has ongoing funding and cross-function collaborationThe industry is moving toward recognition that this is where priorities lie.”  

It is this kind of forward-thinking mindset in employees that helps Circadence deliver state-of-the-art products and we are incredibly proud to have Megan within the Circadence family!  

Rethinking cyber learning—consider gamification

This post originally appeared on Microsoft’s Security Blog, authored by Mark McIntyre, Executive Security Advisor, Enterprise Cybersecurity Group

Cyber Monday and Black Friday Cyber Security Safety Tips to Prevent Holiday Hacks  

If you’re anything like me, you get really excited when the holidays roll around. The music is cheerful (the Hallmark Channel is on 24/7–high five!), the fireplace is roaring, and I can curl up with my blanket and mobile phone to SHOP ONLINE (of course). Ah, the spirit of the holidays…But the bah humbug part about the scene I’ve just set, is I’m not the only one feeling “festive.” Cybercriminals LOVE when surges in online shopping occur because people are looking for the best deals on gifts, bargain hunting, and planning for the biggest online shopping days of the year: Black Friday and Cyber Monday. This means adversaries can more easily manipulate our holiday spirits with cyberattack methods like phishing and social engineering, credit card fraud, and more.

So while you prepare your winter festivities and “add to cart,” consider these 12 tips to keep your “digital dwelling” safe and warm during Cyber Monday and Black Friday, especially.

Shop from websites you know and trust. 

Don’t click on those flashy “hot deals” that are likely too good to be true. Scammers deliver ads based on your interests, offering sweet discounts or great deals to get the click. Now is NOT the time to experiment with new retail websites and apps.

Don’t go “public.” 

Avoid public Wi-Fi when using the Internet, especially when accessing sensitive data like your bank account balance or emails. Your personal information isn’t a “gift” you want to give a hacker this holiday season.

Update your operating systems. 

With a little more downtime during the holidays, take a merry minute to keep your operating systems as current as possible. This also goes for apps on your phone.

Refresh your passwords.

Enter into the New Year with stronger, more secure passwords—something that will keep a criminal out of your personal property and prevent identity theft. Things like symbols and numbers to replace letters add a layer of complexity that make passwords harder to crack. Consider using a password manager to store all your different passwords so you don’t forget them!

To ensure you are protected from any precocious cyber predator, check our security awareness game inCyt, a fun way to learn cyber concepts and attack methods while cozying up on your couch with a hot toddy. You can practice proactive cyber readiness during the holidays—and year-round with this sweet resource. 

Don’t click on suspicious links. 

Scammers, like the Grinch, will impersonate real online retailers and stores to get you to open an email and click on links while you are holiday shopping. Don’t! This phishing email tactic opens the door for them to install malware on your computer and before you know it, your data is stolen and compromised.

Look for the lock. 

Secure websites will often have a lock icon in the browser address bar to indicate it is a secure connection.

Get creative with security questions. 

Your mother’s maiden name or favorite food can most likely be found online somewhere, so try getting creative with your security questions to access your accounts. Choose a motto you live by perhaps or choose an answer to a question that is completely opposite of what you would select.

Watch your bank and card activity.

Hackers can see your financial activity when you’re sleeping and when you’re awake if you’re not careful. Diligently monitor your bank account, online transactions, and card activity and notify your financial services provider if you observe any suspicious activity.

Disable auto-connect.

Some devices will auto-connect to available wireless networks. Ensure you are only connected to wireless and Bluetooth networks when devices are in use or about to be used. Unknowingly being connected is the opportune time for hackers to cause damage right under your nose.

Store devices when away. 

If you’re a busy traveler, criminals seek out meal times to check hotel rooms for unattended laptops and mobile devices. Be especially wary when attending conferences or trade shows as guest networks tend to be more vulnerable to attacks (and allows hackers to access lots of data from lots of people, who are all in one convenient location).

Activate double authentication. 

If you haven’t done so already, ensure all your apps have a double authentication factor so every time someone tries to log in to your online account, they need a code or key that is texted to your phone or sent to your email to gain access. That makes unintended access to things like social media accounts more difficult for cybercriminals.

Practice persistent protection.

Hackers aren’t just looking to exploit individual data, they also target businesses knowing many take extra time off this time of year to spend with loved ones. Ensure your company has a strong cybersecurity response plan in place and key members of your threat intelligence, analysis, and fraud teams are consistently practicing responding to threat scenarios. Our Project Ares platform runs on Microsoft Azure, so professionals can practice cyber offense and defense from anywhere, at any time on a gamified cyber range.

It’s important to practice safe online behavior all year-round but the holidays bring about an extra level of digital activity hackers love to exploit. Make sure you are taking proactive measures to ensure you are having the most wonderful online shopping day of the year—and cybercriminals aren’t.