Things to do at RSA 2020 

This year’s RSA Conference is sure to be chockfull of exciting innovations, new technology, and swag galore. As much as we love the excitement of being on the expo floor, it’s always a good idea to take time to explore the conference, meet new people, and unwind with a few good colleagues or newfound friendsThis list of networking gatherings and affiliate events will help you make the most out of your RSA experience! 

 

Events through RSA: 

  • 2/25 6:00 pm to 8:00 pmCyBeer Ops Networking Reception – Craft beer tasting event that doubles as a great networking opportunity.
     
  • 2/27 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm: RSAC After Hours – Enjoy food, drinks, and dancing to a live 80’s cover band.
     
  • 2/25 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm: RSAC Women’s Networking Reception – Relaxed networking event celebrating women’s contributions to science and technology.
     
  • 2/24 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm: Welcome Reception – Kick off the conference with drinks and apps while previewing cyber solutions from over 700 exhibitors.
     
  • Multiple dates and times, registration required: RSAC Engagement Zone – Engage, network, and make personal connections with others who share your interests through Braindate, Birds of a Feather, Cooperative Learning roundtables, and more.
     
  • Multiple dates and times: RSAC Sandbox – Show off your cyber skills through hands-on experiences and mingle with peers at this engaging event.
     
  • 2/26 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm: Expo Pub Crawl – Enjoy complimentary beer, wine, and non-alcoholic beverages while visiting sponsor’s booths and learning about their latest innovations to support your business. 

 

Affiliate events: 

  • 2/24 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm: CYBERTACOS at RSAC – Talk over tacos with members of the local cybersecurity and broader IT community.
     
  • 2/24 7:00pm to 10:00 pm: Ignite – With live music, snacks, cocktails, and dancing, this is THE place to be Monday night.
     
  • 2/25 5:00 pm to 9:00 pmOptiv After Party – Thirsty Bear Organic Brewing Company will have great beer on tap while you network the night away. 
  • 2/25 6:00 pm, registration requiredVMware Carbon Black Networking Reception – This exclusive happy hour at the W San Francisco is sure to be the event you need to kick off your RSA experience just right. Register now as space is limited.
     
  • 2/25 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm: Non-Profits on the Loose – Meet and mingle with industry, policy, and government leaders in security and privacy at this soirée.
     
  • 2/26 11:30 am to 1:00 pm: Meet & Greet at RSA Conference 2020  Join the Executive Women’s Forum and meet the most amazing women at the RSA Conference.
     
  • 2/26 5:30 pm to 8:30 pmICMP Networking Social RSA 2020  – Network with members, friends, and guests of the International Consortium of Minority Cybersecurity Professionals.
     
  • 2/26 6:30 pm to 9:30 pmArctic Wolf Happy Hour – Sips and savors at TRES Tequila Lounge and Mexican Kitchen is the perfect mid-week way to unwind.
     

Stay up to date on any additional affiliate events as they get added by checking out this calendar provided by the conference, and be sure to swing by our booth #6480 to see what we’ve been working on and add to your swag collection

To get a sneak peek at our latest cyber training platform, inCyt and be sure to register for our webinar, inCyt: Inside the Human Element of Cyber. We can’t wait to see you at the conference and have some fun! 

Living Our Mission Blog Series:Early Aspirations in Technology Become a Reality for Circadence’s Paul Ellis

Early Aspirations in Technology Become Reality for Circadence’s Paul Ellis 

Paul Ellis, Senior Product Manager at Circadence, was always interested in technology, even at a young age. When Paul was 8-years oldhe rode his bike to the closest RadioShack to buy a book written for adults on the topic of electrical engineering no lessAfter saving enough allowance to purchase the book, he dove into it as soon as he got home and that’s where his love for technology really began. 

But perhaps, too, Paul’s passion stemmed from his father, who worked for a company developing computer robots. Their bond over technology contributed to Paul’s interest in the field. In factPaul and his father built their first computer together – an 8Mhz Intel 8088 PC when he was 10 years old. Paul read the entire instruction manual from front to back to learn what he could do with his newly built device. From that day on, he was always creating! He created electronic devices, computers, and even composed music. 

In high school Paul played many different instruments and began his college journey with aspirations to become a sound engineer to satisfy his interest for both technology and music. He quickly realized that his interest in technology outweighed his musical career interest, and that the lifestyle of a sound engineer wasn’t very appealing. 

He changed his major to Business and Marketing and graduated with a Bachelor of Science from California State University San Marcos in 2005. He then continued to Purdue University for an MBA in Technology Commercialization, Marketing and Finance. Throughout his academic journey and in his free time he continued to create and assemble tech devices. He was never afraid of technology; he was drawn to it and always knew there was a way to control it. 

Paul, a techie through and through, followed his cyber heart and became a Senior Product Manager for more than a decade for various leading tech firms. He began to learn about identity risk and how our technological advancements were increasing threats. During his time at a previous employer, LifeLock, he learned about risk prevention, identity theft, how vulnerable consumers are in the real worldand how risk would continue to escalate if companies and individuals weren’t taking precautions to protect themselves and their devices.  

Upon joining Circadence, Paul began to navigate the world of cybersecurityThe company’s cutting-edge ideas and technology designed to protect businesses, government and consumers were appealing to him given what he had observed in previous tech positions. He was interested in the innovative products that provided new ways for cybersecurity beginners and professionals to learn, and he could envision how it would improve the cyber posture of enterprises. 

“I feel like I’m doing something positive for society,” Paul said. He’s been with Circadence for a year now as the Senior Product Manager and continues to be inspired by his team and the revolutionary products Circadence brings to market.  

“There’s a huge threat out there, and a huge lack of skills in the industry, and being a part of the solution is a big part of my intrinsic motivation.”  

Paul enjoys partaking in all the different facets of a product’s lifecycle – how the product supports a need for the consumer or industry, how it is marketed, and how to assess its financial viabilityHe also enjoys talking to customers to learn about their experience with a product first-hand, because at the end of the day, a product’s success is dependent upon customer’s experience with it 

Managing the success of a product is how he gauges the success of his career – what did the product solve, and how did it benefit the customer and the industry? The payoff is seeing the cumulative effect of the entire product,” said Paul. For example, iNovember 2019 he worked long hours along-side his team to prepare for one of our largest partner events – Microsoft Ignite. They developed specific gamified battle rooms in Project Ares to teach user’s about Microsoft’s new security tools and how they can be utilized in realistic cyber scenarios. Attendees could get direct experience using Microsoft’s security tools within Project Ares, which runs on Microsoft Azure 

“Ignite was one of the most meaningful moments in my career and I’m fortunate I had the opportunity to work with my team to pull it off! There was so much teamwork, collaboration and problem solving from planning, developing, to deployment at the event. It’s only in bringing people together, that my work succeeds.”  

Paul not only enjoys doing something that keeps consumers and businesses safer, but he truly respects and values his team at Circadence. There’s a true sense of trust between everyone on his team and he feels fortunate to have this experience in the workplace.  

The need for improved cybersecurity is everywhere,” said Paul. The cyber learning products Circadence provides today will help teach the future cyber workforce and help protect us from the countless risks and threats that are out there. He continues to fulfill his passion for technology by bringing Circadence cyber learning products to marketHe appreciates Circadence products because they actually provide trainees what they need to knowand what they will be doing on a day-to-day basis. It’s not just about reading a white paper or watching a video – gamified platforms like Project Ares provide hands-on experience to master the craft of cybersecurity. 

Photo by Alexandre Debiève on Unsplash

Photo by Marvin Meyer on Unsplash

Hope for Cybersecurity: Cyber Teaching Challenges & New Horizons for Cyber Learning

The statistics are dismal. An estimated 3.5 million unfilled cyber positions by 2021 and today, we have over 300,000 openings in the U.S. alone. According to a New York Times article, “filling those jobs would mean increasing the country’s current cybersecurity workforce of 715,000 people by more than 40 percent,” according to data presented at the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education Conference. If you’re a student in cyber or are just undeclared, there hasn’t been a better time to consider cybersecurity as a professional career. The field has come a long way from the stereotypical hoodie-wearing, Mountain Dew sipping worker in a dark room performing tedious coding tasks.

Cybersecurity is so much more than that—and it’s exciting! Don’t believe us? At Divergence Academy, we are preparing the next generation of cyber professionals to enter the workforce and alleviate the skills gap through gamified learning. If more institutions adopted such an approach, we as educators would be more successful at not just engaging our students in teaching relevant concepts and theory, but successful at helping them build skills needed in today’s workforce.

Cyber Teaching and Learning Challenges

But before we get into the “hopeful” part of this article, we need to understand the challenges in teaching cyber in the first place. The way that cybersecurity has been taught throughout the years often include lectures, PowerPoint presentations or online models that students complete on their own. Inherently there is nothing wrong in teaching new information in this way. However, the opportunity exists to help students learn how to apply this knowledge to a real-world setting. The act of doing and creating the needed experience is the single most important quality job candidates can bring to an employer and this is the gap Divergence Academy is hoping to close.

When students sit in a classroom, information can be presented in a systematic way, where in real life this may not always be the case, especially in the world of cybersecurity.

When you think of teaching someone how to think like a hacker, you are fundamentally teaching them how to be creative in how they approach a situation.

The concept of teaching someone to think like a hacker is easier said than done, which is why diversifying the way students can process information is crucial. Not every student learns in the way same.

There’s Hope for Cybersecurity: Continuous Skills Acquisition and Application

As cyber educators and instructors, we know there is no “one-way” to teach and that’s the good news! While certifications and technical degrees are a starting place for cybersecurity readiness and workforce development, instructors must think of new methods that provide persistent access to cyber education.

This statement can best be described with an analogous story. If an aspiring baseball player was training for the major leagues and went to practice to hone his/her skills, they would certainly learn something. However, if that aspiring baseball player then applied for the major leagues a year or so later, without attending training leading up to that point, he/she would be a little rusty, wouldn’t you say? The same situation can be applied to cybersecurity. You wouldn’t attend a class or even complete a full degree in cybersecurity and then apply for a job and say you were a “seasoned cybersecurity professional,” would you? Of course not. There is no “final inning” in cybersecurity signaling a professional’s peak of learning and skills acquisition.

Threats evolved day by day and if a student graduates thinking about phishing or malware detection one way and ends up in a work environment where that knowledge isn’t applicable anymore, we won’t be able to help the next generation of cyber pros be successful in their jobs. To keep current students and alumni actively engaged in critical learning, persistent access to cybersecurity training must be employed. In this industry, the only constant in cybersecurity is change, and for that reason (in addition to the multitude of attacks businesses every day), educational institutions can be vigilant in putting learning to work for the businesses and workplaces we rely on to support our daily functions.

As technology and interconnectivity evolve with each passing day, steps must be taken immediately to adopt a pedagogy that values and emphasizes continuous learning to best prepare our students for the career they want. With gamified learning at the helm of a new teaching approach for cybersecurity, we can be on our way to minimizing the cyber skills gap and empowering today’s students in a more effective way.

For more information about our gamified learning cyber courses, visit https://divergenceacademy.com/.

 

 

 

Inside inCyt: The Benefits of Gamified Cybersecurity Learning (An Interview with Cassie Brubaker)

Here at Circadence, we are dedicated to taking cybersecurity learning to the next level. We do this through gamification that is accessible to all ages and ranges of knowledge on the subject. Our own Cassie Brubaker, co-creative director on our security awareness mobile app inCyt™, helped us understand the differences between learning and training, and how games can bring value to skill building in the technical world.

Why does cybersecurity really matter in today’s interconnected world?

C: When we don’t understand something, we don’t feel empowered. So, when I think about the importance of cybersecurity and cyber awareness, it’s more a story of empowering people to take back control of their lives. It’s a story about not being scared to live your day-to-day life because you understand [cyber] and you’re in control of it and I think that’s a wonderful thing.

I get that everybody needs to make their companies more secure, but I think it comes at a personal level too. If you feel in control over your personal life, you’re going to be a better contributor to your entire business, you’re going to be a better contributor to your family, you’re going to be a better contributor to yourself.

When we learn more about cybersecurity, we are empowered. Given your expertise with game development, what are the differences between learning versus training?

C: Games provide an inherently clever method to promote learning. There is a place for training, but in my mind, it’s a lot more formal. Learning has a broader application for me. It can happen in all kinds of different moments. You never know when you’re going to learn something new and that’s the magic of it. Training is more like, “let’s get this piece of information across in this specific way.” With our game inCyt, I’ve had so much fun trying to find all the different ways you can learn. You can play it again and again and it’s a little different every time. I can’t guarantee what lesson you’re going to learn when you play today and I don’t know what lesson you’re going to learn when you play tomorrow, BUT you’re going to learn something because you’re engaging with a well-designed product that has been crafted in such a way to give you all kinds of realistic experiences as it pertains to cybersecurity. 

Let’s talk briefly about inCyt and how it uses gamified learning.

C: inCyt is a mobile app that builds cybersecurity awareness. It is designed to educate everyone on fundamental cyber concepts and attack methods. It does this through two learning paths:  a concept learning component and gameplay component for individuals or teams.

The solution is taking the common perception of cybersecurity and flipping it on its head. Cybersecurity, as it exists today, does not conjure up feelings of peace and comfort the way you might expect from a field focused on security and safety. inCyt brings a radically different approach to the existing landscape – one that invites anyone and everyone to step out of the darkness and take their first step towards cyber enlightenment. One of the cool things about this product is that you’re learning organically about cybersecurity as you play, but you’re just having fun battling with your friends. The more and more you play, the more the cyber concepts start to sink in because you’re seeing them applied in real-world scenarios.

Who should play inCyt?

C: inCyt has been designed to reach all ages and experience levels. It’s ultimately designed for people who know very little about cybersecurity, but because we’ve built it to be playful and with a bit of strategy, even people who are cybersecurity professionals could play it and enjoy it. One of the things we found in testing within the company is that people who do this for a living will play it and say, “I think I could actually use this with my family, they don’t understand what I do.”

What is the ultimate value in a game like this?

C: The ultimate value of inCyt as a product for any company is that it is first and foremost fun for your employees to play. They are going to jump in and not going to feel like they’re being put through some mundane training exercise. There are two different ways that were teaching employees about cyber awareness. One of them is what I call “organic lessons” and that’s what happens primarily in the gameplay itself. We give players a bunch of cyber tools and allow them to experiment through gameplay and find what strategies work. In doing this, we’re creating employees that think one level bigger, more strategically about the “whys” and the “what’s” as opposed to a memorized list of rules that need to be followed. Nobody likes that. After learning the basic cyber concepts, players can compete in the gameplay portion of the app.

When working on inCyt, how did you address different learning styles?

C: In terms of different learning styles, that’s really where we’ve gone into playtesting as our method to lean against. Everybody wants something a little bit different when they play – some people want all of the answers up front, they want to know exactly how to use it and they want to know why they’re doing it, while some people want to experiment. Through those playtests, we’re able to make variations of the gameplay that hit the largest range of learning styles. It’s really from a human engagement level, less of a theoretical learning style level. That’s why the playtests have been so helpful for us.

For more information on the benefits of gamified learning, check out the below-recommended reading.

 

Recommended Reading:

The Importance of Gamification in Cybersecurity Training

Why Gamification is the Answer You’ve Been Looking For

Benefits of Gamified Learning

 

Guest Blog: Taking Cybersecurity Learning to a Whole New Level

Last week I was lucky enough to be able to attend Circadence’s Cyber Learning Tour at the Microsoft Technology Center in Chicago.  This event was hosted by Laura Lee, VP of Rapid Prototyping,  and one of the lead creators of the Project Ares training platform.

The opportunity to attend this event and hear from the brains behind Project Ares was an eye-opening experience for me.  The passion that Laura spoke with was something that I could relate to.  As someone who personally advocates for introducing more people to information technology and more specifically cybersecurity, it was amazing to hear Laura Lee talk about how she utilizes Project Ares in schools as early as middle school to educate students on not only the importance of cybersecurity but also real-world scenarios.  Hearing Laura talk about kids using Metasploit, Nmap, Wireshark and learning how to defend simulated cyber-attacks or infiltrating networks with Project Ares is taking learning to a whole new level.

One of the more interesting topics Laura brought up about the platform is the scoring capability and how it works within the learning environment.  She often finds students begin competing against each other on the platform by going through missions and assessments over and over again to see who can get the better score.  This brings another avenue of excitement and energy to cybersecurity that could lead to more exposure with things such as e-sports using Project Ares.

The fact that Circadence has created a learning environment that brings gamification, cybersecurity, and training to the same platform is ground-breaking to me.  Here is a platform that will simulate real-world scenarios like bank networks, power grids, and other enterprise networks and you either must attack (red team) or defend (blue team) using real-world skills and tools.  If you’re a rookie at cybersecurity, Project Ares offers a variety of battle rooms and assessments that will help get you up to speed.

To hear more about why gamification and AI-powered cyber learning is the future of cybersecurity skill building, check out one of their other Cyber Learning Tour stops here: https://marketing.circadence.com/acton/media/36273/cyber-learning-tour-with-microsoft.

Follow Zach’s YouTube Channel I.T. Career Questions for all things cybersecurity learning and development here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt-Pwe2fODjH4Wuwf5VqE7A.