When cyber security meets machine learning

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What happens when cyber security and machine learning work together? The results are pretty positive. Many technologies are leveraging machine learning in cyber security functions nowadays in order to automate and augment their cyber workforce. How? Most recently in training and skill building.

Machine learning helps emulate human cognition (e.g. learning based on experiences and patterns rather than inference) so autonomous agents in a cyber security system for instance, can “teach themselves” how to build models for pattern recognition—while engaging with real human cyber professionals.

Machine learning as a training support system

Machine learning becomes particularly valuable in cyber security training for professionals when it can support human activities like malware detection, incident response, network analysis, and more. One way machine learning shows up is in our gamified cyber learning platform Project Ares, under our AI-advisor “Athena” who generates responses to player’s queries when they get stuck on an activity and/or need hints to progress through a problem.

Athena generates a response from its learning corpus, using machine learning to aggregate and correlate all player conversations it has, while integrating knowledge about each player in the platform to recommend the most efficient path to solving a problem. It’s like modeling the “two heads are better than one” saying, but with a lot more “heads” at play.

Machine learning as an autonomous adversary

Likewise, machine learning models provide a general mechanism for organization-tailored obscuring of malicious intent during professional training—enabling adversaries to disguise their network traffic or on-system behavior to look more typical to evade detection. Machine learning’s ability to continually model and adapt enables the technology to persist undetected for longer (if it is acting as an autonomous agent against a trainee in our platform). This act challenges the trainee in the platform in a good way, so they begin to think like an adversary and understand their response to defensive behavior.

Machine learning supports cyber skills building

Companies like Uber use machine learning to understand the various routes a driver takes to transport people from point A to point B. It uses data collected to recommend the most efficient route to its destination.

It increases the learning potential for professionals looking to hone their cyber skills and competencies using machine learning.

Now imagine that concept applied to cyber training in a way that can both help cyber pros through cyber activities while also activating a trainee’s cognitive functions in ways we previously could not with traditional, off-site courses.

Machine learning abilities can analyze user behavior for both fraud detection and malicious network activity. It can aggregate and enrich data from multiple sources, act as virtual assistants with specialized knowledge, and augment cyber operators’ daily tasks. It’s powerful stuff!

To learn more about machine learning and AI in cyber training, download our white paper “Upskilling Cyber Teams with Artificial Intelligence and Gamified Learning.”

Photo by Startup Stock Photos from Pexels

Guest Blog: Embracing Immersive, Gamified Cybersecurity Learning, Featuring Divergence Academy

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What is immersive, gamified cybersecurity learning? The term was originally coined in 2002 by a British computer programmer named Nick Pelling. The term hit the mainstream when a location-sharing service called Foursquare emerged in 2009, employing gamification elements like points, badges, and “mayorships” to motivate people to use their mobile app to “check in” to places they visited.  The term hit buzzword fame in 2011 when Gartner officially added it to its “Hype Cycle” list. But gamification is more than a buzz word. Companies have seen gamification work for them in cyber team training—so we thought it wise to take what is working and apply it at the earlier stages of career development—in the classroom.

At Divergence Academy, we are proud to offer a curriculum that embraces blended cyber learning to cultivate students and transitioning professionals who are ready to enter the workforce and stop today’s cyber threats.

We offer data science, cybersecurity, and cloud computing immersive learning programs that enable students to gain the knowledge and skills needed to work in any of those fields. Many of our courses offer a mix of concept-driven learning and application-driven learning so that students understand new knowledge and, in turn, apply that knowledge in skill building, project-based activities. Through working with messy, real-world data and scenarios, students gain experience across the entire technology spectrum.

Studies find when learners engage in active learning, hands-on activities, their information retention rates increase from 5% (with traditional, lecture-based methods) to 75%. The millennial generation presents radically different learning preferences than previous generations. Thus, educational institutions across the country should consider gamification as a pedagogical technique in the classroom. A study from the University of Limerick notes:

Gamified learning activities could become an integral part of flipped teaching environments. Their social, asynchronous nature can be used to prompt students to engage with pre-prepared content, while gamified learning activities can be used in the classroom to prompt student interaction and participation.

In watching our students engage with gamified activities, we see team-building blossom before our eyes. We see instant collaboration and problem-solving and critical thinking emerge. Those kinds of soft skills can’t always be taught in a traditional lecture-based setting and because of that, it is critical that we continue to offer a healthy mix of concept-driven learning with gamified learning opportunities to our students so that they can enter the workforce with a more holistic understanding of the industry.

Cybersecurity has become a captivating and engaging subject matter for students, which is fantastic as those words aren’t typically associated with the technical field.

“Wow, today we were introduced to Project Ares. Captivating is the best description I can think of. It is like ‘Call of Duty’ for cybersecurity.”
~ Divergence Academy Student, 24 years old

Fellow professors and instructors are looking for ways to make cybersecurity more interesting and attractive to students and we believe at Divergence, the gamified learning approach can help. It is an approachable way for students to engage with a field they may be completely unfamiliar with and it supports instructors by offering a course that students WANT to take.

“We notice an increase in student engagement in the classroom with the introduction of Project Ares. Gamification brings an element of intrigue and satisfaction to the learning experience.”
~ Beth Lahaie, Program Director

We hope our adoption and proven success of a blended learning approach is the nudge other institutions around the globe need to consider its power in building the next generation of cybersecurity professionals.